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Saturday, February 28, 2015

APA Sample: BOULDER CITY 31ERS: A PHENOMENOLIGICAL STUDY OF A COMMUNITY BASED HISTORY PRESERVATION PROJECT

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APA Style Sample.


BOULDER CITY 31ERS:
A PHENOMENOLIGICAL STUDY OF A COMMUNITY BASED HISTORY PRESERVATION PROJECT
by
Arthur T. Lynch

Dr. Mark H. Rossman, Ed.D, Faculty Mentor and Chair
Dr. Maxine Rossman, PhD, Committee Member
Dr. Behrooz Sabet, PhD, Committee Member

Barbara Butts Williams, PhD, Dean, School of Education

 DRAFT ONLY: AS OF 6/26/2012
This is protected by copyright, but is not an accepted or published dissertation. It is a draft.

A Dissertation Presented in Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirements for the Degree
Doctor of Philosophy


Capella University


 
© Art Lynch, 2012



Abstract
This dissertation used a phenomenological approach in investigating the development of a grass roots community history based educational outreach and chronicled its development from inception to incorporation into the mission of an established institution. The theoretical basis for the study was Deweyian principles of student centered, experiential learning while supporting a collaborative partnership between school and community, and education’s role in civic engagement and democracy.  These ideas were explored through the lens of a three-legged stool: Public Policy and Purpose, Community Interaction and Identity and Pedagogical Issues. An important characteristic found in successful community programs, no matter the cultural or socioeconomic status of the community, is that they should make use of community members talents and skills, reflect the values of that community in a meaningful way, and come from the community itself, and also make an effort to offer positive improvement, growth, and change. The themes found during the observation of the program might serve as a useful template for other programs, including civic engagement (both organizational, macro level and individual, micro level), meaning (to learners, teachers, and volunteers), experience (experiential learning, experience of participants) hands-on learning, sharing of memories and experience, community relationships), and a sense of identity (in the passing down of memory, teaching of history, and with the individual learning activities of students, as learning is closely connected with identity. These themes provide the fundamentals for how we learn, and participate and grow in our individual and community life.

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