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Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Never Forget


Court says 9-11 cross may be displayed at the 9-11 memorial museum...Cross saved by firemen, construction workers and originally put on display at Ground Zero.

Four Legged Heros


People believe what they read in the papers, even if they know it is not true. If enough people say it is true than people will believe it to be true."

-From the movie "Tucker", bit it applies to the attacks on Harry Reid, the president and anyone who does not agree with the big dollars fueling the Tea Party and an effort to continue to control public opinion and manipulate the truth.

Sorry you were not home


9-11-01 Pentagon

As I re-post this the ceremony marking the tenth anniversary of Flight 77 hitting the Pentagon is about to begin at the Pentagon. I am working my board shift at KNPR 88.9 FM and Nevada Public Radio statewide.

First posted 5-25-2010

As we head into Memorial Day Weekend remember all of those who lost their lives in the service of our country. On Monday of this week I was given a tour of the Pentagon by my life long friend Lt. Col. Robert F. Cain III, who is stationed at the Pentagon. The memorial above, along with the names of those lost on 9-11 at the Pentagon, a Chapel and a sculpture of benches mark the site where Americans lost their lives on the plane and while doing their jobs for the greater defense of the nation.

May we never forget.



Blogs and 9-11


9/11: Birth of the Blog

Robert Andrews Email 09.11.06

When the world changed on Sept. 11, 2001, the web changed with it.

While phone networks and big news sites struggled to cope with heavy traffic, many survivors and spectators turned to online journals to share feelings, get information or detail their whereabouts. It was raw, emotional and new -- and many commentators now remember it as a key moment in the birth of the blog.

When four planes were hijacked on a sunny fall morning, easy-to-use blogging services were still few and far between. Yet many who witnessed the horror of the attacks firsthand took to the keyboard to talk with the world.

Horrified Americans used e-mail, instant messages, any available communication tool. But weblogs meant large audiences, not just friends and family, could read those stories from the scene.

"I have a scrap of paper that flew onto my roof," wrote New Yorker Anthony Hecht. "Typewritten and handwritten numbers in the millions. A symbol of our tragedy. It smells like fire."

Many bloggers strayed from their normal writing beats to produce a rolling news service comprising links to materials and tidbits gathered by friends.
Dave Winer, author of one of the earliest and most popular weblogs, Scripting News, used his site to post one-line news flashes, New York webcam stills and links to witness accounts.

The chaos was "a galvanizing point for the blogging world," said Dan Gillmor, director of the Center for Citizen Media.

"We had this explosion of personal, public testimony and some of it was quite powerful," Gillmor said. "I remembered that old cliche that journalists write the first rough draft of history. Well now bloggers were writing the first draft."
Five years on, the outpouring of emotion was a signpost to the emerging grassroots media revolution, said social media consultant Matthew Yeomans, who remembers his Brooklyn neighborhood being showered with debris from the World Trade Center.

"Back in 2001, blogs were still very much the geek toy of the Slashdot set," he said. "(But) this collective tragedy demanded a forum to be shared by people all around the world who wanted to talk about what happened with anyone because it was the only way of making any sense of it. Were it to happen again, blogs and social networks would play an enormously cathartic role."

The vivid events live on in countless blog posts. NYC Bloggers, a directory of hundreds of New Yorkers' blogs, continues to link to dozens of articles for posterity, while the September 11 Digital Archive project maintains a historical catalog of noteworthy blog posts among 130,000 e-mails, audio recordings, video clips and photographs documenting the event.

This year, another project is recruiting 2,996 volunteer bloggers to post individual memorials celebrating the life of each 9/11 victim.

Since 9/11, the rise of "warbloggers" and online political commentators like Glenn Reynolds' Instapundit has been, in many cases, a direct response to the U.S. government's post-9/11 foreign policy, kickstarting a culture of questioning, poking and prodding from which no public figure is safe.

But the volume of another attack, should one occur, could be amplified still further by newer technologies. The growth in ownership of cell-phone cameras since 9/11 meant that commuters' contributions to coverage of last year's southeast Asia tsunami and the July 7 terrorist attacks on London tube trains were more pictorial and more immediate; eyewitness accounts could be sent to moblog websites without having to find a desk or a docking station.

"Camera phones have changed the landscape," said Alfie Dennen, proprietor of the moblogUK service, which received some of the first dramatic imagesfrom members at London's 7/7 bomb scene.

"Where 9/11 was covered explosively in the blogosphere, 7/7 set the bedrock for wider acceptance of the value in citizen media," he said. "It was definitely the point at which ordinary people with camera phones became the news."
Had the feature been more widely available in 2001, Sept. 11 may now be remembered by even more iconic images.
Dan Gillmor said: "It wouldn't change the basic horror of it (but), if the people on those planes who were calling their families were also sending video, we would have a very different understanding of that day."

Remember 9-11. One World Trade may not be the symbolic memorial envisioned by the nation when it was announced.

To save twenty million dollars, the owners of One World Trade Center, formerly the Freedom Center, are going to give up the promised symbolic 1776 foot height and the the official title of tallest building in America. By not enclosing the broadcast antenna with a "tower" they give up both titles, just as they did the partiotic "Freedom Tower" name.

A change to the design of a needle that will sit atop One World Trade Center is raising questions over whether the building will still be America's tallest when completed.

The 408-foot-tall needle will no longer be enclosed in a fiberglass-and-steel enclosure called a radome, a feature that was recently removed from the original design because the building's developer says it would be impossible to properly maintain or repair it.

Without the enclosure, it's unclear whether the needle is an antenna or a spire — a crucial distinction in terms of measuring the building's height. Without the spire, One World Trade Center would actually be shorter than the Willis Tower (Sears Tower) in Chicago, which currently wears the crown of tallest building in the U.S. at 1,451 feet, not including its own antennas.

Last week, the skyscraper became New York City's tallest building as workers erected steel columns that were just high enough to rise above the Empire State Building's observation deck. The building is being constructed to replace the twin towers destroyed in the Sept. 11, 2011, terror attacks.


Remember 9-11?


published May 10, 2012

Little Theatre Kicks off 2013-2014 season


From left, Mark Brunton, Stacia Zinkevich, T.J. Larsen and Daci Overby are scheduled to perform "God of Carnage " through Sept. 22 in the Fischer Black Box at the Las Vegas Little Theatre, 3920 Schiff Drive.

The Las Vegas Little Theatre, 3920 Schiff Drive, is scheduled to premier its 2013-2014 season Sept. 13.
Founded in 1978 by Jack Bell and Jack Nickolson, the theater hosted its first productions in a converted storefront. Nearly 36 years later, the theater continues the founders’ mission to increase the awareness of theater arts in Southern Nevada, provide quality productions and offer educational opportunities in all aspects of theater.
“We want to reach as many people as we possibly can,” said Walter Niejadlik, theater president. “We offer really high-quality productions for a really reasonable price.”
The organization has three performance spaces — the Main Stage, Fischer Black Box and Studio Theatre.
The Main Stage, which seats 154 people, is set to feature six larger productions this season, including “And Then There Were None” and “Barefoot in the Park.”
Each production is scheduled to run for three weeks with performances at 8 p.m. every Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. every Sunday. A performance is also planned for 2 p.m. the second Saturday of each production.
Single tickets for the Main Stage productions are $24 for adults and $21 for seniors and students. Seasonal packages, which offer one ticket per show, are $114 for adults and $102 for seniors and students.
“We tend to show a little more traditional pieces on the Main Stage,” Niejadlik said . “The shows are a bit bigger because the stage is bigger.”
The Fischer Black Box allows actors to connect more intimately with the audience as it seats only 45 people, according to Niejadlik. Five productions are scheduled this season, including “God of Carnage” and “Hunter Gatherers.”
Each production in the Fischer Black Box is scheduled for three weeks with performances at 8 p.m. every Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. every Sunday.
Single tickets are $15 for adults, $14 for seniors and students and $13 for Las Vegas Little Theatre subscribers. Seasonal tickets are $50 for subscribers or $65 for nonsubscribers.
“The cast can reach out and touch the audience during performances in the Black Box stage,” Niejadlik said. “The works are a bit edgier and are more geared toward younger audiences.”
The Studio Theatre is a smaller space located a few doors from the main location.
Performances in the Studio Theatre are scheduled to run for three weeks at 8 p.m. every Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. every Sunday. Tickets are $12 for adults and $11 for seniors and students.
“The space is used for very modest productions because it only seats about 30 to 35 people,” Niejadlik said. “We also hold classes and rehearsals there.”
Niejadlik said guests should reserve tickets ahead of time because certain productions and times may sell out more quickly than others.
“Generally, our busiest days are Saturday nights and Sunday afternoons,” he said. “We just don’t want anyone to show up and be disappointed that we don’t have a seat for them.”
Auditions for stage crew and actors are typically six to eight weeks before the performances and are posted online. Anyone interested in auditioning for a production also can sign up for email announcements.
According to Niejadlik, individuals auditioning do not need prior experience. He said most of the auditions just require people to show up and give it their best shot.
“Anything we do, we try to make it as accessible as possible to anyone who wants to be part of it,” Niejadlik said. “We have people who have experience and have been in productions, and then we have people who have never even been on a stage before.”
While age requirements depend on the role of the character, Niejadlik said the organization usually looks for people who are at least 18. However, it has cast children as young as 14 with parental consent.
“We have a children’s company that caters more toward children 15 or younger,” Niejadlik said, “but we do make exceptions if the roles fit.”
The theater’s sister company, Star Arts Productions, offers classes, workshops and productions for children throughout the year. The Las Vegas Little Theatre also hosts classes for adults and children.
“If you’re interested but have no experience, you should come down anyway and we’ll help you get the experience,” Niejadlik said. “We have lots of great folks with lots of professional backgrounds that are always willing to teach.”
The organization is also looking for volunteers to usher, run concession stands and help backstage.
Ami Meyers, 22, started volunteering as an usher and concession-stand worker in 2009.
“A friend of mine was in one of the shows, and I asked the staff if there was a way I could help out,” Meyers said. “Volunteering has given me exposure to so many different productions and talented people. It’s been really exciting.”
Meyers, who also works in the box office, said she has met some of her best friends while at the theater.
“It’s a great way to meet folks and get involved if you’re new in town or looking for new friends,” Niejadlik said. “We also get visits from some notable people that you may also meet.”
Niejadlik said Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos, supports the organization financially and visits often.
“He’s been a huge supporter of our theater and not just by writing checks. He actually shows up and sees the productions and brings his friends,” Niejadlik said. “We’ve been fortunate to have his support over the past couple years.”
Comedian and writer Rita Rudner and comedy illusionists Penn Jillette and Teller have also been spotted at the theater.
“Everyone you see at the theater are folks from the community that are volunteering their time and talents,” Niejadlik said. “I think people will be pleasantly surprised once they come down.”



In honor of all who have died for their country, civilian and military, the Memorial Day 2013

9-11-01 Pentagon



As I re-post this the ceremony marking the tenth anniversary of Flight 77 hitting the Pentagon is about to begin at the Pentagon. I am working my board shift at KNPR 88.9 FM and Nevada Public Radio statewide. 

First posted 5-25-2010

As we head into Memorial Day Weekend remember all of those who lost their lives in the service of our country. On Monday of this week I was given a tour of the Pentagon by my life long friend Lt. Col. Robert F. Cain III, who is stationed at the Pentagon. The memorial above, along with the names of those lost on 9-11 at the Pentagon, a Chapel and a sculpture of benches mark the site where Americans lost their lives on the plane and while doing their jobs for the greater defense of the nation.

May we never forget.