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Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Pirates of the Caribbean

An unusual twist in a Caribbean gambling fight now involves America's entire media industry. The tiny islands of Antigua and Barbuda are threatening to strip copyright protections from American media. It's part of a long-running dispute over the U.S. blocking Americans from playing in Antigua's online casinos. Hollywood is furious, calling the potential move government-sponsored piracy. More from the Marketplace Midday Update (American Public Radio) -click here.

Steps for Extemporaneous Speaking





Overview

This lesson introduces students to the six steps of writing an extemporaneous speech, one that is prepared and rehearsed ahead of time: Choosing a topic, Researching, Writing, Practicing, Delivering, and Processing.

Objective

Students will: 
  1. Learn the four purposes of speeches: to inform, to persuade, to entertain, and for special occasions.
  2. Brainstorm and decide upon a topic that is interesting to both the speaker and the audience.
  3. Research using traditional and non-traditional sources.
  4. Write and outline the body of the speech.
  5. Translate the speech into simple notes.
  6. Write an intriguing introduction and conclusion.
  7. Practice non-verbal cues, such as smiling, eye contact, gesturing, etc.
  8. Deliver an extemporaneous speech for no more than 10 minutes.
  9. Evaluate other speeches and provide positive feedback.
Materials
  1. Steps to the Perfect Speech Topic (PDF) from Oral Presentations Made Easy!by Paul B. Janeczko
  2. Index cards
  3. Speech Rubric from Lesson One
  4. Idea Web
  5. Chalkboard or chart paper
  6. Research materials and tools, such as a set of encyclopedias, nonfiction books, magazines, newspapers, CD-ROMs, and the Internet
  7. Video or audio taping equipment (optional)
Set Up and Prepare
  1. Copy the Steps to the Perfect Speech Topic printable for each student.
  2. Gather a set of index cards for each student to be used as note cards during his/her speech.
  3. Schedule computer lab time for research, if desired.
  4. After students have chosen their speech topics, provide as many research materials as possible using your school and/or local libraries.Write the six steps on the board, chart paper, or post on a bulletin board: 1) Choosing a topic, 2) Researching, 3) Writing, 4) Practicing, 5) Delivering, and 6) Processing.
  5. If desired, prepare any AV equipment for Step 13 when students record themselves while rehearsing their speech.
  6. If necessary, preview thisIdea Web (PDF).

Directions

Step 1: Begin the lesson by distributing a randomly chosen volume from the classroom set of encyclopedias and/or another type of research material to each student. Instruct them to use the resource to find an interesting topic. Tell them they have 15 minutes to gather as much information on the subject as they can and write the most important points on index cards.
Step 2: Upon completion, invite several volunteers to deliver a basic three-minute talk on their chosen topic.
Step 3: Process the activity by asking the students what differences they noticed between these types of speeches and those from Lesson One. Compare an impromptu speech with an extemporaneous speech. Share with the students that an extemporaneous speech is researched and rehearsed ahead of time. Note cards are permitted. The topics are likely to be assigned and the speech is usually intended to do one of four things: to inform, to persuade, to entertain, or to share on special occasions. The speech generally ranges between three to ten minutes.
Step 4: Share with the students that they will be writing and delivering an extemporaneous speech over the next few days. Introduce the six steps and briefly discuss the expectations.
PART II - You may want to spend at least one day on each of the six steps of writing an extemporaneous speech as you teach this lesson.
Step 5: Choosing a Topic — Distribute the Steps to the Perfect Speech Topic printable to each student. Remind the students of the six steps. Tell them that they will choose a topic today by brainstorming every idea they can think of, using specific criteria to narrow down the ideas, and creating an idea web to decide on "the perfect topic." Instruct them to read through the printable and complete the process.
Step 6: Researching — Remind students that they will need to disclose sources that they used during their research in the body of their speech, preferably one from a traditional print source such as an encyclopedia, magazine, or nonfiction book, one from an Internet or CD-ROM source, and one from a non-traditional source, such as a personal interview, a fiction title, or song lyrics. Therefore, they need to conduct a good amount of research.
Step 7: Distribute more index cards and tell students to write the title and other important data, such as the author, publisher, and date of publication, of each source onto the index cards. Remind them to share this information in the body of the speech.
Step 8: Allow ample time for students to complete the research phase.
Step 9: Writing —Once students have gathered all research and completed their index cards, they can begin writing the body of their speech. Share with them that the speech structure is similar to that of the essays that they have written in class and consists of three parts: Introduction - you tell them what you are going to tell them, Body - tell them, and Closing - tell them what you have told them.
Step 10: Instruct the students to first concentrate on the body of their speech. Decide on three main points to make during the speech using the information they gathered during the research phase. Then, create an outline with supporting details for each main point. Write out the speech using the outlines. Finally, they must transfer that information to bulleted points onto index cards. Remind them that they will not be reading their speech, but using the index cards to stay on track. Allow ample time for students to complete the body of their speech.
Step 11: When students are finished, help them craft an engaging introduction and conclusion. Briefly discuss the need to "hook" the audience when delivering a speech. Share the five audience-grabbing techniques and instruct them to decide which they will use for their introduction: Tell a story, Cite a statistic, Ask a question, Paint a picture, and Share a quotation. Provide examples when necessary.
Step 12: Share that the conclusion is like the introduction but in reverse order. Tell them to begin with a recap of what they discussed in the speech and end with a memorable closing statement. Provide examples when necessary.
Step 13:  Practicing - Allow students to spend a class period rehearsing their speech. If desired, video or audio tape them so that they can critique themselves later. Encourage each student to practice out loud, practice making consistent eye contact with the audience while taking occasional glances at their note cards, and write any last minute notes of encouragement or final details on their note cards. Remind students that they will be graded according to the rubric standards, so they should review it at this time.
Step 14:  Delivering - Students are now ready to deliver their extemporaneous speeches. Instruct them to hand you their rubric prior to beginning. Tell the audience to refrain from talking or distracting the speaker and to make mental notes of each speech in order to provide feedback at the end. Upon completion of each speech, ask a few volunteers to share some positive feedback with the speaker.
Step 15:  Processing - The day after, instruct students to write a self-reflective assessment of their experience in this process. Encourage them to write freely about what worked, what needed improvement, and any other thoughts or or feelings they had during the process.  Invite volunteers to share, but do not make it a requirement.  Collect the assessment.

Supporting All Learners

Work closely with struggling students throughout the process or pair them with helpful partners

Lesson Extensions

Address the common occurrence of stage fright. Have students or groups brainstorm strategies that can reduce anxiety.

Home Connection

Send a note home to parents, informing them of the "big day" when the speeches will be delivered in class.  Encourage them to rehearse with their child.

Assignments

Research and deliver a "quick" three-minute speech. Write an extemporaneous speech following the six-step process.

Evaluation

Conduct a similar self-reflective assessment about your teaching experience of this unit on oral presentations.  Answer the following questions: What were the high and low points of teaching this unit? What seemed to flow smoothly? Why? What did not flow smoothly? Why not? What would you do differently next time? Do you have any other observations, insights, thoughts, or feelings relevant to teaching this unit?

Monday, January 28, 2013

Using anti-piracy measures to make piracy less attractive does work



How to Stop Piracy: Carnegie Mellon Professor Michael Smith at DBW

Making content available digitally and participating in anti-piracy policy is the best way to fight back against illegal downloading which despite rumors, does harm sales. This is according to Michael D. Smith, professor of information technology and marketing at Carnegie Mellon University.
In a presentation at the Digital Book World Conference in New York today, Smith argued against three myths that he said permeate the discussion on illegal downloading. The first is that piracy doesn’t harm sales, which he said is not true. “Piracy harms sales,” he said, claiming that while 3 studies have been published suggesting that piracy doesn’t hurt sales, 25 others have shown that piracy is bad for sales. ”There are options to use legitimate distribution channels to convince people who have stolen your content to buy it,” he added.
Another statement that Smith said he hears a lot is that, “You can’t compete with free.” He claims that this is a myth. “Competing with free is just a special case of price competition,” he said. According to Smith, if someone wants to consume your content digitally they will, regardless of if it is available for sale or not. He doesn’t consider offering a physical version of the product a viable alternative and said that someone who wants to consume something digitally will not buy the print edition if it is the only available version. Instead, he said, this consumer will likely try to obtain a digital version of the content illegally.
Smith also spoke about NBC as an example. In 2007, the TV network removed its content from iTunes after a fight with Apple. After doing do, piracy of NBC shows increased. “When people couldn’t find it in iTunes anymore they went to piracy,” concluded Smith. (During this time DVD sales remained steady.) Piracy increased 11 percent for NBC titles and ABC, CBS and FOX, also saw increases in their content being pirated. “There was also a negative spillover effect for the industry because people learned how to pirate,” explained Smith.
Illegal downloads were more popular for comedies and sci-fi shows than drama. When NBC returned to iTunes in 2009, piracy didn’t go away, because, as Smith explained it, “people went and learned how to pirate.”
But when ABC partnered with Hulu they saw a 37 percent decrease in piracy, and no change in DVD sales, illustrating that making content available can lead to a decrease in piracy.
Smith also gave an example of a publisher who kept its eBooks from Amazon for two months after the print version came out. While the publisher (who he didn’t name) didn’t see an increase in piracy, they did see a decrease in sales. According to Smith,  delaying eBooks only led to 0.4 percent increase in hardcover sales, and a 52 percent decrease in eBook sales. “People don’t consider a hardcover as a good substitution,” he said. “They just didn’t come back.”
The final myth that Smith aimed to bust is that, “Anti-piracy regulation won’t work.” According to Smith, law enforcement around illegal downloading is not a game of whac-a-mole. “You can use laws to make pirated content less attractive,” he said. Citing the global Megaupload shutdown, Smith claimed that the shutdown helped lead to an increase in legal digital content consumption. “The shutdown of Megaupload caused a statistically significant increase in digital sales,” he said, comparing numbers between countries with high Megaupload usage to countries with low Megaupload usage.
According to Smith, every 1 percent reduction in Megaupload usage translated into a 2.6-4.1 percent increase in digital sales. Though, Smith did point out that Megaupload had a higher usage than digital content sales sites. “It does suggest that when you look at competing with free, using anti-piracy measures to make piracy less attractive does work,” he said.
Smith also spoke about NBC as an example. In 2007, the TV network removed its content from iTunes after a fight with Apple. After doing do, piracy of NBC shows increased. “When people couldn’t find it in iTunes anymore they went to piracy,” concluded Smith. (During this time DVD sales remained steady.) Piracy increased 11 percent for NBC titles and ABC, CBS and FOX, also saw increases in their content being pirated. “There was also a negative spillover effect for the industry because people learned how to pirate,” explained Smith.
Illegal downloads were more popular for comedies and sci-fi shows than drama. When NBC returned to iTunes in 2009, piracy didn’t go away, because, as Smith explained it, “people went and learned how to pirate.”
But when ABC partnered with Hulu they saw a 37 percent decrease in piracy, and no change in DVD sales, illustrating that making content available can lead to a decrease in piracy.
Smith also gave an example of a publisher who kept its eBooks from Amazon for two months after the print version came out. While the publisher (who he didn’t name) didn’t see an increase in piracy, they did see a decrease in sales. According to Smith,  delaying eBooks only led to 0.4 percent increase in hardcover sales, and a 52 percent decrease in eBook sales. “People don’t consider a hardcover as a good substitution,” he said. “They just didn’t come back.”
The final myth that Smith aimed to bust is that, “Anti-piracy regulation won’t work.” According to Smith, law enforcement around illegal downloading is not a game of whac-a-mole. “You can use laws to make pirated content less attractive,” he said. Citing the global Megaupload shutdown, Smith claimed that the shutdown helped lead to an increase in legal digital content consumption. “The shutdown of Megaupload caused a statistically significant increase in digital sales,” he said, comparing numbers between countries with high Megaupload usage to countries with low Megaupload usage.
According to Smith, every 1 percent reduction in Megaupload usage translated into a 2.6-4.1 percent increase in digital sales. Though, Smith did point out that Megaupload had a higher usage than digital content sales sites. “It does suggest that when you look at competing with free, using anti-piracy measures to make piracy less attractive does work,” he said.

Monday, January 21, 2013


Inauguration Day 2012!

Equality to All: not an entitlement but a right!

"We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths –- that all of us are created equal –- is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall; just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great Mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone; to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on Earth. (Applause.)

It is now our generation’s task to carry on what those pioneers began. For our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. (Applause.) Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law –- (applause) - for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. (Applause.) Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. (Applause.) Our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as a land of opportunity - (applause) - until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. (Applause.) Our journey is not complete until all our children, from the streets of Detroit to the hills of Appalachia, to the quiet lanes of Newtown, know that they are cared for and cherished and always safe from harm.

That is our generation’s task - to make these words, these rights, these values of life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness real for every American."


-President Barrack Obama on his second inauguration day, Martin Luther King Day 2013

President Obama's Second Inauguration


"Read my face"


Be aware of how your facial expressions come across to the audience when you are giving your speech. Just as you should be aware of what you are saying, you should be aware of what your facial expressions are saying.

Allow me a personal indulgence.



For the past decade I have been working on earning a PhD in Education. This past month I became Dr. Art Lynch. My apologies to all who may have seen less of me on the set or had phone calls lost between the cracks. I have been and will continue to use my education and experience to represent all of us in the complexities and politics of the SAG-AFTRA National Board.

Sunday, January 20, 2013

Learn Poetry 'By Heart,' Not By Rote


by NPR Staff
Emily Musette Hays performs in the 2012 Poetry Out Loud finals in Washington, D.C. The U.S. competition served as a model for the U.K.'s Poetry By Heart contest.
James Kegley/The Poetry Foundation
 
When the Internet offers a superabundance of material to read, watch, listen to and play, it's easy to skim over text and half-listen to broadcasts. But the British government is inviting schoolchildren to put down their cellphones, turn off their news feeds and spend a long time lingering over a poem — so long that they learn it by heart.

The United Kingdom's Department for Education is funding a nationwide poetry-reciting contest called Poetry By Heart, similar in structure to Poetry Out Loud in the U.S. and other poetry competitions in Canada and Ireland. The contest, at the county level, requires students to memorize two poems from a list of 130 choices and recite the poems by heart in a series of competitions.

English poet Jean Sprackland helped select the poems at the heart of the contest. She joins NPR's Scott Simon to discuss the pleasures of poetry memorization.

Interview Highlights

On learning by heart, not by rote
"Well, I suppose there's a great difference between learning by heart and the old-fashioned, rather dusty phrase 'learning by rote.' So there's a thought that if you learn by heart it means you take the poem right into yourself, it becomes part of you. And it remains with you, probably for the rest of your life. I think a lot of us can remember bits of poetry that we learned when we were very young. So it's something that lives with you forever."

On selecting the poems for Poetry By Heart
"We wanted to represent a great variety, a great richness of different sorts of poems in there. So it starts — the earliest poem is a 14th-century poem called 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,' by an anonymous poet, and then we go right up to the present day. ... We wanted to build a lot of variety into there so that young people could choose something to memorize and read aloud that appealed to them and that really was exciting and enjoyable for them to engage with. And we chose everything with that in mind, with memorizing and speaking aloud in mind. But as you can imagine, it was a terrifically difficult set of decisions to make because with anything like this there are always many, many more poems that you would like to include. And this is just for the first year, so we're hoping that the selection will grow and change as the competition continues in future years."

On a poem she learned by heart
"One of the first poems that I began to learn was [John] Keat's 'Ode to a Nightingale,' which of course I know as an adult is one of the great English Romantic poems and is full of all this stuff about the ephemeral nature of love and youth and life. But I think probably as a 10- or 11-year-old I didn't know that at all. I just loved the sound of the words, and the sound of the words held meaning for me and the way the words tasted and felt in my mouth when I spoke them. So that's what I first loved about the poem, and then it's been a lifelong love affair. I've read the poem so many hundreds of times and remembered it and gone through it in my own head when there's nothing else that I need to be doing. So I think that's a good example, really, of how you can learn something very early in your life and it lives with you always."

Welcome To Alaska, Where Winter Is Cold And Bikes Are Fat

fromKUAC

Audio for this story from Weekend Edition Sunday click here.

Bike shop owner Kevin Breitenbach rides a fat bike in the White Mountains National Recreation Area in Alaska in March.
 
The plummeting mercury in Alaska this time of year doesn't keep bikers inside. More and more of them are heading to recreational trails and to the office on "fat bikes." They look like mountain bikes on steroids, with tires wider than most people's arms.

Kevin Breitenbach runs the bike shop at Beaver Sports in Alaska's second-largest city. He makes his way down a trail that winds through a forest, and wet, quarter-sized snowflakes drop from the sky. Visibility is low, and the snow hides the roughest spots on the trail.

His bike is Breitenbach's primary form of transportation. When he's not commuting to work, he's racing in ultra-distance events.

"Now if we were out here on regular mountain bikes, you'd just be all over the place. The bikes are set up to be stable, and so you can go much slower and still maintain your balance," he says.

The wider tires on fat bikes roll over the snow better than regular mountain bikes. The first fat bikes were made by welding the rims of three mountain bikes together.
The wider tires on fat bikes roll over the snow better than regular mountain bikes. The first fat bikes were made by welding the rims of three mountain bikes together.


In the late 1980s, cyclists in Alaska were looking for a good way to tackle snowy trails, so they welded three mountain bike rims together. That allowed for fatter tires that almost float on top of the snow. Today, fat biking isn't quite so "do it yourself."

The market for a bike like this is still small, but it's the fastest-growing segment of the cycling industry. At Goldstream Sports, just north of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, owner Joel Buth specializes in cross-country skis and road bikes. But four years ago, he added fat bikes to his winter inventory.

"The bikes are typically a $3,000 sale, versus a ski package, which is much less. So there's more customers in the ski, but the bike market is growing rapidly," he says.

That $3,000 isn't just for the bike. It includes all the other gear as well, like extra tire tubes, shoes and lots of winter clothing. It's the fat bike clientele that surprises Buth most.

"Mostly what I see is the backcountry enthusiast and older couples, too, that just want to get out and get exercise in the winter and don't want to mess around with skis, and they just like to bike," he says.

Back on the trail, Breitenbach says fat biking is more fun than skiing, even when temperatures hit 50 degrees below zero.

Presidents Use Bully Pulpit To Shape American Language In 'Words'

by NPR Staff
Audio for this story from Weekend Edition Sunday click here.
Words from the White House
Words From The White House
Words and Phrases Coined or Popularized by America's Presidents
Hardcover, 197 pages purchase
The office of the president offers a lot of responsibilities and privileges. Your actions drive the world's most powerful military, billions of dollars worth of domestic policy and, perhaps most importantly, the way the country speaks.

That's what linguist and writer Paul Dickson contends in his new book, Words From the White House. It's a look back through history at the words and phrases popularized by our presidents — including the ones they don't get credit for anymore.

Teddy Roosevelt, for example, loved language, Dickson tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "He would create a word like 'mollycoddle,' for sort of somebody you would say was timid, and 'bully pulpit,' you know, the bully pulpit being the presidency itself." Presidents, Dickson says, have to be eloquent. "They have to be able to get up there and convince people."

Dickson says the most eloquent and convincing president was Thomas Jefferson. "To this day, in the Oxford English Dictionary, there are 114 terms which are laid at his feet — either pure coinages or him being the first to use it," he says. "And some of them are quite interesting."

Did you know that Jefferson was apparently the first to use the word "ottoman" to refer not to the empire, but to the footstool? And Dickson says words like "pedicure" and "lengthily" are also attributed to our third president — along with, appropriately enough, "neologize."

"He writes a letter to John Adams, who's another very good creator of language, ... and says, 'It's our obligation as Americans to neologize, to create a new language, which is the American language,' " Dickson says. That language would be full of Americanisms like "OK" and "slam dunk," which might be sneered at by a speaker of the King's English.

The new American language is curter and more direct. "You say mob instead of 'a large group of angry people.' That's Americanism," he says.
 
Paul Dickson is the author of more than 55 books. His latest, Words From the White House, describes the lexical innovations of America's presidents.

In the modern era, Dickson points to Harry Truman as a master of presidential language. "He brought back old folk terms like 'snallygaster,' and he had wonderful slogans like 'the buck stops here.' " One of the most interesting terms Truman brought back, Dickson says, was the word "trocar," which was an instrument farmers used in rural Missouri, where he was from, "when a bull or a cow had eaten too much clover and had amassed a huge amount of gas inside of them. ... They would use this instrument to allow the gas to come out through the proper orifice." There was, he adds, the occasional joke about a whistling noise sounding across the plains when farmers applied the trocar to their livestock.

"Truman actually, in a letter to one of his aides, said that he felt ... 'somebody should take a trocar to Congress and use it to deflate the egos,' " Dickson says. "I like Truman's stuff because he was a very plain-speaking man who used these rural things that were probably a great puzzlement to more urban people."
Speaking of plain-spoken, George W. Bush also makes an appearance in the book. Bush was known for scripted phrases like "Axis of Evil," but also spontaneous utterances like "embetter."

"I gave him the benefit of the doubt because everybody was howling and yelling and screaming ... 'embetter' was first cited in the Oxford English Dictionary, with the same exact meaning that George Bush gave it, in 1583," Dickson says, though it has since dwindled into obscurity.

Likewise, the OED traces "resignate" all the way back to 1531. "One of the ones they really tried to nail him with was 'strategery,' " says Dickson. "Which of course was not Bush himself but was Saturday Night Live ... but 'misunderestimate,' which was one of the real howlers that a lot of people cited, is actually fairly useful."

Presidents need to be spontaneous, but also have a good understanding of the language in order to coin new words, Dickson says. "When Roosevelt first gave his fireside chats to coach the country out of the Depression, [he] made a very conscious decision to use the language of baseball, as opposed to the language of politics. ... The president, in order to be a really good communicator, has to realize that he can't talk to the people with the same metaphor they would talk to, you know, someone in his party hierarchy, that if he really wants to get to people, he's got to give them something they can latch onto."

Read an excerpt of Words From The White House

Friday, January 18, 2013

Banned Popeye 1943


"Let us not look back in anger, nor forward in fear, but around us in awareness." (James Thurber, 1894 – 1961)

Do schools kill creativity?



Ken Robinson says schools kill creativity

     Review by a student///   


        He   was   talking   about   how  when  you  ask  a  teacher  what  is  your  job  they  tell  you they  are  teachers  that  you  see  the  blood  going  to  their  face , i  think  thats  not   true   
because  they  picked  to  be  teachers  and  some  of  them  love  their  jobs  they  go  to  college  for  years  and  he  says  that  some  of  them  don't  like  their  jobs  that's  not  right .The   other  thing he does not  sound  the  words  right , i think  he  is  right  because  they  don't   care  about   kids  being  creative  all  they  want  them  is to learn  how to  do math  problems  and ,  kids  these days they  are  so out there in the world they are  like  5 years old they  would  be  on facebook  or even  playing on the xbox but in  school  they  think that the  kid is stupid  because he can't do a math problem or even spell a word .


   He  is  well  educated  the lights in the room  was  not  enough   for  a big  room like that there is a  lot  of  people  i  the  room and not that much light . He  looked  at  every  side of  the  room\i think speeches   should  be  like  that. he  was funny and , serious , he informed people with kids , education . He   was  a  great  speaker .The  only  thing  i  didn't  like  is  that  he was   not   moving   that   much . He would laugh at everything he said  for me if the speaker laughs at everything he says then he would not send the message that he wanted people to know .


I would love to stand in front of people like that and talk and not be too nervous or even turn red . When i do a speech and it won't be that much people in front of me and i get so red and i would not know who to look at .



http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity.html

Art Lynch resume and CV, January 2013



Dr. Art Lynch

536 Sixth Street, Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 454-1067 • (702) 714-0740 • (702) 682-0469 cell


 Overview

Accomplished communications field professional with combination of academic and field experience. Experience with multi-cultural student populations and blended hybrid web-assist instruction, concentrated and full term instructions, high school and college. Field experience includes broadcast and print journalism, media, marketing, advertising and public relations, film industry and theater work; also organizational development, leadership and volunteer supervision experience. Teaching includes communication, media & cultural studies, history, critical thinking, marketing, education, theater, acting and related fields.

Education

PhD, Education            2012

Capella University, Minneapolis, MN

Specialization: Professional Studies in Adult Education
•     Relevant courses: adult education instruction and philosophy, distance education instruction and administration, curriculum design, critical thinking, evaluation and assessment (60+ credit hours). 4.0
Dissertation: Boulder City 31ers: A Phenomenological Study of a Community-Based History Preservation Project

Post Masters Certificate in College Teaching                                                                           October, 2008
Capella University, Minneapolis, MN
•      On-line and classroom teaching preparation, design and assessment program. 4.0 GPA

           

M.A. Communications            June, 2000

University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Thesis: The Performers Alliance: Conflict and Change Within the Screen Actors Guild.
Honors: Phi Kappa Phi, Theta Kappa, Lambda Pi Eta
•     Postgraduate courses in a variety of fields (67 credits total) including theater (37 credits), communication, public affairs, public administration, media, and marketing. 3.77 (3.80 UNLV total)

Post Graduate Courses in Theater            2001 to 2003

University of Nevada. Las Vegas
•      MA program track, performance, education, management, dramaturgy and research.

B.A. Speech / Theater / Mass Communications / SDC      June, 1977
University of Illinois at Chicago
•    Program /Operations Manager WUIC, Chicago, reporter for Chicago Illini
•    Recipient of Theater Honors and Production Awards, academic honors and awards
•    Communications Honor Society, Sigma Chi Eta, NAHS, NFL, Key Club, Deans Honors
•    Faculty included Dr. Harry Skornia, media and international broadcasting scholar.
•    Guest faculty included R. Buckminster Fuller, Studs Terkel and others for SDC program



Academic Teaching Experience
Associate Professor
University of Phoenix            2011 to present
•     Courses Taught: Media & Culture, Critical Thinking, Communication, and various Humanities
•     Hybrid course with classroom plus on-line components

Professor / Instructor
Carrington College            2012 to present
•     Courses Taught: Communications- Interpersonal and Public Speaking (for physical therapy and repertory therapy programs)

Adjunct Instructor            1998 to 2012
University and Community College System of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV
•     Includes Full time equivalency, 6 to 36 credit hours per semester at College of Southern Nevada.
•     Courses Taught: Speech, Communication, Public Speaking, Interpersonal Communication
•     Teach regular semester and one month or 6 week long courses using blended environment including
      Blackboard. Web CT and Angel instruction to maximize student participation and teaching
      opportunities. Volunteer Communication Lab. Positive student and faculty evaluations.
•     Developed support and resource materials for online use to foster understanding of communication
      theory, models, public speaking including study reviews, links to primary resources and examples.
      Linked sections for larger study and resource “community.”
•    Taught Contemporary Radio at University of Nevada, Las Vegas (2004).

Instructor                                                                                                                                    2008 to 2009
Student to Teacher Enlistment Program, Las Vegas, NV
Undergraduate Program
Clark Country School District / CSN / Nevada State College, Las Vegas, NV
•      STEP-UP At-Risk Student to Teacher Enlistment Project CCSD and CSN//NSC. Taught speech
       communications at several high schools in a supportive program designed to spark student interest in
       teaching career.   STEP UP is a collaborative effort of the college and school systems, which gives an
       opportunity for at risk students to attain a teaching degree with scholarships for tuition and supplies.
       A second goal of the program is to enrich the education experience at Clark County schools with a
       multi-ethnic teaching force that reflects the district’s diverse population.

Other Teaching Experience
Instructor                                              2010 to 2011
Everest College
•    Communication (for primarily at risk student population).

Arts Instructor                                              2008 to current
Boulder City Parks and Recreation, Boulder City, NV   
•    Offering acting workshops for children and adults to community members.
•    Assisting with ongoing collaboration to develop living history, narrative theater with Boulder City
     schools, Bureau of Land Management and other community agencies.  Activities include research,
     writing, acting, teaching, and development of school curriculum.
                                                                                                            

Acting and Life Coach                                                                                                           2009 to current
CastingCallEntertainment.com, Las Vegas, NV           
•    Coach acting and voice-over, children to adult.

Acting Instructor             1996 to 2008
John Robert Powers Intl. / Style Entertainment, Kim Flowers Talent Development Academy,
Las Vegas, NV
•    Taught audition, scene, improv, and industry knowledge, competition preparation for beginning to
      Elite students for film and commercial work. Coached working actors and business community.
•     Developed curriculum for commercial and acting for camera classes, requiring establishment of
      requirements and goals in stepped programs established for beginning, intermediate and advanced
      students. Crafted and implemented assessment for student advancement and faculty evaluations.

Studio Casting, Las Vegas, NV                                                                                        1994 to 1998
•     Director of Education and Training
•     Established program from ground up including all acting and modeling courses and showcases.

Acting Coach            1984 to current
•    Teach various private and group classes in theater, film, television, commercial, event, spokes-
     modeling, voice over, and character voice. Adapted to each student and group as needed.

Instructor             1984 to1987
Las Vegas Business College / Phillips College
Courses taught: Marketing, Advertising, Public Relations, Communications, English.

Related Professional Experience

Reporter / Columnist/ Examiner, Las Vegas, NV            2009 to present
Examiner.com           
•    Writer, correspondent, columnist

Announcer, Producer, Host            2001 to present
Nevada Public Radio (KNPR/KCNV/network), Las Vegas, NV
•    On air / live hourly announcements during programs, responsible for programs and underwriter
     broadcast within scheduled timeframes, news, promotions, troubleshooting of engineering problems.

Advertising Agency / Communications Consultant             1990 to 2002
A Personal Vision / Creative Communications  (owner), Las Vegas, NV           
•     Provided advertising, marketing, public relations, creative directing, media planning and account
      supervision consulting to wide variety of clients.
•     Clients included Canyon Rent to Own, Hammargren for Lt. Governor (successful), retail and
       professional clients, entertainment industry.
•     Produced, directed, supervised and/or wrote commercials or videos, plus print, web and other
       advertising resulting in awards, response and image recognition for clients.
•     Member Better Business Bureau (maintained to current) and Chamber of Commerce.

Advertising Manager, Marketing Director            1984 to1991
Canyon Rent To Own           
•     Locations in Nevada, Hawaii, Utah, California, Florida, Guam, Massachusetts, and Arizona.
•     Developed successful marketing plans to expanded market recognition and share resulting in “Top of
      Mind” status in all markets. Produced award-winning advertising with direct response impact.

Broadcaster, Journalist, Talk Host, Consultant                                                                        1974 to current
•     Award winning reporter and correspondent in diverse markets.
•     Includes Group W Westinghouse Chicago (WIND), Intermountain Radio Network/ABC, UPI, AP,
      Nevada Public Radio, various stations (CA, WY, IL, NV), Chicago College Radio Network, NPR
 
Professional Development
Capella University Colloquiums, four five day seminars on subjects including teaching techniques, assessment, technology, at risk, non-conventional students, ESL, multi-cultural teaching environments, motivational speaking, curriculum development.

CAPE at CSN, continued professional development seminars on a wide range of topics.

University of Phoenix offers regular training on-line and in person on an ongoing basis.


Professional Associations
National Communication Association
The American Communication Association 
National Forensic League 
Sigma Delta Chi /Society of Professional Journalists
Phi Kappa Phi Honors Society, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (April 28, 2005)
Professional Audio Visual Communications Association, President 1986-93; VP 1985-86

Service Work

Board of Directors (working board) Dam Short Film Festival, 2009-current
Announcer and Host of Nevada Recreation and Park Services On-Site Institute, 2009
Founder and President of Us Company, Boomtown Players, Vintage Theater, others (various years)
National Board of Directors, Screen Actors Guild 1996-current, currently co-chair on New Technologies Committee and New Media Task Force, active in Communications, Young Performers, Right-to-work, Organizing, Web, and Background Performers (see Screen Actors Guild section) 
President, Nevada Branch of the Screen Actors Guild 1995-96; VP 1994-95, Council 1990-95
Founder / Director / Chair, Screen Actors Guild Nevada Conservatory 1994-2004
Editor, Nevada Actor 1990-2001       Editor, CDW News 1985-87      Editor, AdAGlance, 1991-94
Reader, Radio Reading Service for the Print Impaired, KNPR, 1993 to 2006
Board Member, Las Vegas Ad Club 1986-93, Publicist and/or Newsletter Editor 1986-1995
Chair of the National Tourism Awareness Week Logo Contest (NV/Chamber) 1992-93
Us Company Theater, 1972-1977, (cast included Dan “Homer Simpson” Castenelatta, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, Dale Calandare, Sean & Trish Grennan, other international award winning talent),
Founder, President, Director or Producer volunteer theater projects, 1973-2006
Produced election coverage, UICC 10th Anniversary Concert and other events WUIC 1974-1977
Program & Operations Manager / Organized and Supervised volunteers at WUIC, Chicago 1974-1977
Professional Awards
APRO Awards (national) for Canyon Rental, 1995, 1996, 1997
Telly Awards (International and National) for Canyon Rental, 1995
Addy Awards of Excellence for Young People Inc. for TV under $2,000, 1993, YPI for TV Campaign,
1993, Hammargren for Lt. Governor, Campaign 1994, 1995 Hammargren for Lt. Governor, TV under $2,000, 1994, 1995
IABC Award of Excellence for Ad A Glance Newsletter, GLVAF / Las Vegas Ad Club, 1990, 1992           
AP California Spot News Awards, 1983, 1984; AP California Small Market News Station of the Year, 1983, AP Instant News Award (national), 1981 / Special Event Coverage Award (regional), 1982
Wyoming Association of Broadcasters Station of the Year, 1979, News Station of the Year, 1979, 1981
Program of the Year, 1980, Special Event Coverage, 1981
Associated Press (Rocky Mountain and Wyoming), News Station of the Month (numerous), 1978-1981
              Station of the Year (Wyoming), 1979
United Press International (Rocky Mountain Region) Correspondent of the Year, 1979 Rocky Mountain
              Spot News Award, 1980
Inter Mountain Radio Network / ABC Station of the Year, 1979, Spot News Awards, 1979-1981
Chicago Broadcast Association Awards coverage of the 10th anniversary of UIC and election coverage. 
Who’s Why Among America’s Teachers 2005
Chancellor’s List, 2005 (among others)
Nevada’s Most Distinguished several years
Who’s Who and Equivalent 1973-current  (several categories)

Publications
Blogs:                        http://art-lynch.blogspot.com / sagactoronline.com
                        http://sagactor.blogspot.com / comprofessor.com
                        http://artlynch.org

Archive:             http://www.scribd.com/Art%20Lynch

Various freelance and public relations print on request.

Presentations
31ers: Lecture and recreation of engineer Frank Crowe for Nevada Parks and Recreation Convention, seminars, community events, schools and educational seminars. Researched, wrote, produced, and performed material based on primary historic documents and recorded testimonials on the building of the Boulder Dam (preferred by 31er surviving families to Hoover Dam).

The Business of Acting, acting seminars, acting conservatories and other presentations at community events, for Screen Actors Guild and park services.

Numerous presentations before committees and the board of the Screen Actors Guild.

Communication industry experience
Extensive broadcast and print management, journalism, talk host, operations, news director, producer, talent, film and television (various). Employers include Group W, UPI, ABC/IMN networks and various stations or employers. 

Marketing including public relations and public affairs, including University of Illinois Medical Center (internship), A Personal Vision/ Creative Communication, Canyon RTO, theater events, various clients.

Various motion picture, television, on-line and theater production experience including: Hearst Entertainment, Ted Mikels /TVM Global (Script Supervisor), Creative Communication, UIC, Biograph.



Technical Skills
Experience with WebCT 4.1.5, Blackboard/Web CT CE 6.2, BlackBoard Learning Systems, Angel, Virtual College, MS Word, PowerPoint, MS and Mac, broadcast video and audio, technical theater.

Training as Script Supervisor, Dramaturge, Trainer, Continuity, Voice Artist, Actor, Singer


Information and Entertainment Industry

Screen Actors Guild: National Board Director, 14 years
Talent: Actor, Voice Artist, Singer, Writer, Producer, Director, Coordinator, various productions
Production: Creative Communications / A Personal Vision: commercial producer, director, and writer
Educator: Coach acting, voice, theatre, and film at Kim Flowers, JRP, Studio Casting
Broadcaster: Producer, director, host for entertainment centered talk radio and news


Art Lynch

536 Sixth Street, Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 454-1067 • (702) 682-0469 cell • Createcom@gmail.com

Screen Actors Guild / SAG-AFTRA

Elected Positions:
2009-2012       Regional Branch Division Executive Committee Member (by Division Board)
2001-2010            Co-Chair, National New Technologies Committee (by National Board, President)
2004-2008          Co-Chair, National Communications Committee (by National Board and President)
2004-2009          Co-Chair, National Background Committee, Regional Branch Subcommittee
2001-2003       Chair, Standing Trial Board Committee, Nevada Branch (by Nevada SAG council)
1994-2011             National Board of Directors (by membership)
1999-2009            Chair Election Nominating Committee for Nevada (by Nevada SAG council)
1998-2001             National Communications Editorial Supervisory Committee (by RBC)
1997-2001             National Nominating Committee (by Regional Branch Conference)
1997-2001             8th National Vice President Nominating Committee (by RBC)
1995-1996             Nevada Branch President (by membership in Nevada)
1994-1995             Nevada Branch Vice President (by membership in Nevada)
1990-1995             Nevada Branch Council Member (by membership in Nevada)

SAG National Presidential Appointed Positions:
2011-current            Service members, Veterans and Families Action Task Force
2007-2009            New Media Task Force, co-chair (committee sunset 2009)
2006-current            Honors, Tributes and Awards Committee
2005-current            National Equal Ethnic Opportunity Task Force
2004-2006            National Spanish Language Media Task Force
2002-current            National Right-to-Work Presidential Task Force
            1999-current             Web Oversight and Steering Committee
            1999-current             Editorial Sub-Committee
1998-current             New Technologies Committee, co-chair (2005-current)
            1998-current             Communications Steering Committee
            1998-2008            Merchandising and Marketing Sub-Committee
1995-current             Communications Committee (co-chair 2001-2004)
1999-2000             National Contract Adjustment Committee
1995-2002             National Conservatory Committee (co-chair 1998-2000)
1995-2002             Young Performers Committee
1995-1996            National Executive Search Task Force
1997-2000          Guild Government Review Committee
2002-2010            Indy Outreach, Low Budget, Documentary, Merchandise, New Member Orientation, Steering, Health Care Task Force, Dancers, Global Rule One, New Technology, various as member or alternate (as needed by Guild)

SAG Nevada Branch Appointments:
2001-current             Chair of Standing Trial Board and Investigative Committees
1998-current             Communications Committee Chair
1996-2003          Wage and Working Conditions (Vice-Chair)
1992-current             Nevada Actor Newsletter Editor
1999-2008            Nominating Committee Co-chair (except years up my seat up)
1992-2001             Chair and Director of SAG Nevada Conservatory Program
1994-1995          Executive Search Committee Chair

Art Lynch

536 Sixth Street, Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 454-1067 • (702) 714-0740 • (702) 682-0469 cell


 Supplement:

Please consider the following attributes:

• I am experienced teaching in one of the most diverse markets in America.

• I am and have been a dedicated, reliable and professional instructor for CSN, which has been my primary employer over the past decade. I know I would be an asset as full time faculty.

• I have taught between 6 and 18 credit hours a semester of COM 101 and/or COM 102 each term plus summer school (when available) at CSN since 1999, under the supervision of Angela Holland, James McCoy, Dr. Tim James, Cameron Smith Basquiat and Joanne Vuillemot.

• I am a volunteer for the Communication lab, providing one on one coaching and assistance to students across curriculum and Communication studies courses and instructors.

• I have experience hiring, training, supervising and motivating both employees and volunteers.

• I always seek to help others bring out their own potential and personal best. There is aptitude and there is talent. Both can be developed to meet personal, community, and professional needs.

• I have developed syllabi and course materials for courses including public speaking, interpersonal communication, Contemporary Radio, Journalism, Media Studies, Mass Media, Marketing, Advertising, Acting, Personnel Management, Marketing and other courses during my professional career.

• I have experience as a journalist, marketing professional, professional talent, communication consultant, broadcaster and writer.

• I feel that my evaluations and student references reflect that I have provided an excellent teaching experience to a diverse student body using effective teaching strategies.

• I have taught on all three primary campus locations, in addition to Green Valley, Boulder City, Nellis Air Force Base and at risk student STEP-UP high school locations.

• I have taught most course times available at CSN, including four, six week, eight hour and half day sections. I have demonstrated flexibility in scheduling and service for CSN.

• I have taught in computer labs, small offices, large lecture halls and the full diversity of course room opportunities at CSN and elsewhere.

• I have functioned in the capacity of student advisor for my students, and others, including those who utilized the communication lab during my volunteer hours. I also advise those interested in careers in communication, theater, film and other areas on a regular basis through my other outside activities.

• I have completed coursework required for a PhD in Education, including course design, execution, evaluation and competencies by course outcomes.

• I have a professional background in marketing, advertising and the needed skills to participate in recruitment and other activities.

• I have experience on committees, in leadership positions with volunteer organizations, as well as other skills that will ensure that I am a valuable addition to CSN’s full time faculty.

• I maintained an office for one term on the West Charleston campus. I regularly keep office hours at the Com lab or at specific tables on the campus location where I teach. I also arrive early or leave late when classroom space is available, to facilitate meeting with students.

• I am looking forward to regular participation in department, college and professional development activities. I have used what is made available through the school for adjuncts.

• I have the required masters degree in Communication, plus experience in the field.

• I feel I have more then demonstrated proficiency in teaching public speaking and interpersonal communication courses at the college level. I feel confident in my ability to teach group communication and other courses as needed for the Communication Department at CSN. 

• I feel that in ten years of being a part of the CSN community I have shown my commitment to and knowledge of the Community College mission and philosophy.

• I have a strong commitment to remaining current in the communication discipline. I write an active blog, keep on top of trades, participate in various organizations and have kept in touch with professionals in the field, as well as other faculty members.

• I have a strong commitment to ongoing professional development, including use of services offered by CSN, professional seminars, pursuing of a PhD in Education, use of technology in my teaching, co-chair of the communication and new technologies committees of a national organization, and the constant challenge of adapting to changes within Communication and related disciplines. I serve as one of only four board members for the Dam Short Film Festival in Boulder City, am past president of the Professional Audio Visual Communication Association, have launched and run theater, broadcast and community organizations.

• I am strongly committed to a diverse student community, the success of our students and the advancement of the College of Southern Nevada as a leader in academic and professional certificate studies, ongoing adult education and community service.




Art Lynch

536 Sixth Street, Boulder City, NV 89005

(702) 454-1067 • (702) 682-0469 cell • art.lynch@artlynch.org

 
Current Professional / Academic References

Hank Greenspun School of Communications / Journalism and Public Relations, 
College of Fine and Performing Arts / Graduate College
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154           

Richard J. Jensen, Prof. Emeritus, (505) 797-4530.
Dr. David Henry, Director, Greenspun School, dhenry@unlv.edu (702) 898-3030
Dr. Jeffrey Koep, Dean, Fine and Performing Arts, jkoep@unlv.edu (702) 895-4210
Linda McCollum, American Stunt Fighters Assn. mccollum@unlv.edu (702) 895-3662

Community College of Southern Nevada, 3200 E. Cheyenne, North Las Vegas, NV 89030
Angela Holland, Lead Faculty, Angela.Holland@csn.edu (702) 651-5983
James McCoy, As. VP Student Affairs, James.McCoy@csn.edu. (702) 651-3550

KNPR/Nevada Public Radio, 1289 South Torrey Pines Drive, Las Vegas, Nevada 89146
David Becker, Program Director, davebecker@knpr.org

Casting Call Entertainment, Sharry Flaherty, castingcallentertainment@yahoo.com 702-369-0400

Boulder City Parks and Recreation, Patty Sullivan, psullivan@bcnv.org (702) 400-3254 / 294-0335

Screen Actors Guild
Hrair Messerlian, former SAG NV Executive, (559) 433-6870 home / (559) 244-1830; hmesserlian@yahoo.com
David White, National Executive Director, Screen Actors Guild, (323) 549-6555 dwhite@sag.org

Personal References

Anna Puss, aunt, (708) 848-9263
Laura Lynch, LCSW, wife, (702) 454-1067 / (702) 898-1287, LPCordelia@gmail.com
Don Brakeman, actor, (702) 493-7729, donbrakeman@sbcglobal.net
James Campbell, voice artist/ toy designer, jimffd2@yahoo.com, (702) 528-3611
Sandy Lukasik, (630) 357-3767 home. SAMMIE357@aol.com
Lollo Sievert, actor / SAG / web designer, lollo@mrgwell.com
Michael Toole, writer/film maker, 702-741-0812,
Ed Luckett, Jr, M.Div.M.Am, Instructor, Chaplain, 702-380-1006, b.e.luckett.jr@gmail.com
Ray Spinka, teacher / actor / retired LA County Probation Officer, (909) 796-7436, fspinka@yahoo.com
Jim Austin, Broadcaster  (GM/OM/PD/SM), (704) 947-3345 / 578-4465/ 578-5464, resqd1@bellsouth.net
Lt. Col Robert Cain, Army Surgeon Gen Of, ret. Pentagon, (703) 862-7825, rob@ancientromerefocused.org


''Part of teaching is helping students learn how to tolerate ambiguity, consider possibilities, and ask questions that are unanswerable.''

- Sara Lawrence Lightfoot