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Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Doonesbury’ creator Garry Trudeau discusses divisive strips about abortion

By ,   From the Washington Post (click here) 


Only once in the long history of “Doonesbury” has Garry Trudeau’s syndicate ever intensely objected to one of his story arcs. It was 1985, and the subject was abortion.

Starting Monday, amid heated debate about pre-termination ultrasound and sonogram bills in Virginia and Texas, Trudeau, whose comic strip has about 1,400 clients, will tackle the politically sensitive issue of abortion head-on.
(Courtesy of Universal Uclick) - A single panel of Garry Trudeau's \"Doonesbury.\"


“To ignore it,” Trudeau told The Washington Post, “would have been comedy malpractice.”

The result is that many newspaper editors have been weighing whether to run this week’s “Doonesbury.” The Oregon­ian in Portland is among at least several papers that won’t be running the series. In a note to readers Friday, the editors said Trudeau “went over the line of good taste and humor in penning a series on abortion using graphic language and images inappropriate for a comics page.”

The paper is directing readers online if they want to read the strip.

The Associated Press reported that two Florida papers, the Gainesville Sun and the Ocala Star-Banner, have decided against running the strips as well.

The Cleveland Plain Dealer, by contrast, plans to run the strips, saying, “Garry Trudeau’s metier is political satire; if we choose to carry ‘Doonesbury,’ we can’t yank the strip every time it deals with a highly charged issue.” The Kansas City Star will run the series on its op-ed pages. The Post plans to run the series.

The Post spoke with Trudeau about the current strip and the 1985 strips, which were yanked by Trudeau and Universal Press Syndicate, now Universal UClick, “Doonesbury’s” syndicate.
Q: In 1985, you decided to pull a week of abortion-related strips satirizing the film “The Silent Scream,” which purported to show the reactions of a fetus. So what’s different now? What spurred you to create an abortion narrative in the current political climate?
 

A: In my 42 years with UPS, the “Silent Scream” week was the only series that the syndicate ever strongly objected to. [Syndicate president Lee Salem] felt that it would be deeply harmful to the feature and that we would lose clients permanently. They had supported me through so much for so long, I felt obliged to go with their call.

Such was not the case this week. There was no dispute over contents, just some discussion over whether to prepare a substitute week for editors who requested one [which we did].

I chose the topic of compulsory sonograms because it was in the news and because of its relevance to the broader battle over women’s health currently being waged in several states. For some reason, the GOP has chosen 2012 to re-litigate reproductive freedom, an issue that was resolved decades ago. Why [Rick] Santorum, [Rush] Limbaugh et al. thought this would be a good time to declare war on half the electorate, I cannot say. But to ignore it would have been comedy malpractice.

Q: After four decades, you’re an expert at knowing the hot-button satiric words and phrases — such as, in the case [this] week, terms such as “10-inch shaming wand.” Can you speak to how you approached writing these strips?


A: Oddly, for such a sensitive topic, I found it easy to write. The story is very straightforward — it’s not high-concept like [the satiric] Little Timmy in “Silent Scream” — and the only creative problem I had to work through was the physician’s perspective. I settled on resigned outrage.

Texas’s HB-15 [bill] isn’t hard to explain: The bill says that in order for a woman to obtain a perfectly legal medical procedure, she is first compelled by law to endure a vaginal probe with a hard, plastic 10-inch wand. The World Health Organization defines rape as “physically forced or otherwise coerced penetration — even if slight — of the vulva or anus, using a penis, other body parts or an object.” You tell me the difference.

Q: Going back through the history of the strip, I'm surprised not to see a previous abortion strip in “Doonesbury’s” dossier. Have you tackled abortion before?
 

A: No. Roe v. Wade was decided while I was still in school. Planned Parenthood was embraced by both parties. Contraception was on its way to being used by 99 percent of American women. I thought reproductive rights was a settled issue. Who knew we had turned into a nation of sluts?

Q: Over the past 40 years, “Doonesbury” helped change the comics game for many newspapers and comics creators themselves. Do you think newspaper editors have “loosened up” over time regarding comics? Or have they grown more reluctant or skittish — or, even worse, dispassionate?
 

A: It’s a mix, but in general I spend much less time playing defense, presumably because of the ubiquity of topical satire these days. “South Park” and “The Daily Show” have stretched the envelope so much, most editors no longer see “Doonesbury” as the rolling provocation they once did.

Plus, I think I get a bit of a pass simply because I’ve been around so long. After all this time, editors know pretty much what they’re going to get with the strip.

From the Washington Post (click here) Published 3/12/2012

Xtra Credit for CSN Com 101 and 102

Due the day of the final exam or the final day of class, NOT BEFORE.

EXTRA CREDIT: Occasionally, the opportunity to earn a few points of extra credit may arise.  Please note that extra credit opportunities are scarce and are provided at the discretion of the instructor.  There is a cap on extra credit points that any one student may earn, up to a maximum of 50 points during the semester. Any extra credit points you earn will be added into your final grade at the end of the semester in a manner explained by the instructor.

Standard college paper requirements apply: double spaced, headers and footers, 12 point professionally acceptable font, spell corrected, grammar and other guidelines. Feel free to take advantage of the services in the writing center and communication lab in proofing your work.
There is no length or number of references requirement. 
Grading will be based on the work you put in, the quality of the work, and the ability to identify and use the terminology of the course accurately and effectively. There is no page minimum or limit. A grade of 10 out of 50 is not a failing grade. It would reflect ten points worth of work.
You may submit multiple Extra Credit assignments during the term or on the last day of the term and each will be graded separately.
While a maximum of 50 points can be awarded, based on our 1,000-point scale, additional work will count, along with participation (including the blogs), to borderline or qualitative decisions by the instructor at the end of the term.

Opportunity One:
There have been many issues that rocked or shattered this fall's elections. Pick one and look at it from the perspective and prism of this course. As an example yhe current health care debate is historic in its scope and implications.  You may look at the entire debate, the evolution of the debate or at a specific speech and do the following:
1.    Use as many of the concepts of the course as apply (including persuasive and argumentation chapters) to review the rhetoric of the debate.
2.    View the debate from the perspective of other social sciences, again using the concepts of this and the other study area in doing so.
3.    Do a detailed study of the methods of persuasion used by either side in the debate (there are multiple sides once you start to look into it, so pick one and focus on that group or viewpoint). This study should use the terms and concepts of the course.
You must have references and links. Submit your paper electronically. You are also giving implied permission for the material to be posted on the blog or distributed to my three current COM 101 course sections.
Due date is open, however preferred while the issue remains topical and near the top of mind of fellow students and the media.

Opportunity Two:
Pick any specific speech on any topic and do the following:
1.    Use as many of the concepts of the course as apply (including persuasive and argumentation chapters) to review the rhetoric of the debate.
2.    View the debate or speech from the perspective of other social sciences, again using the concepts of this and the other study area in doing so.
3.    Do a detailed study of the methods of persuasion used in the speech or debate. This study should use the terms and concepts of the course.
4.    Show a full understanding of the speech or debate selected and of the concepts of this course.
You must have references and links. Submit your paper electronically. You are also giving implied permission for the material to be posted on the blog or distributed to my three current COM 101 course sections.
The speech may be current or historic, but I request you be able to critique the visual. There are links in the right hand column of my blog, in the textbook and in the chapter reviews located on Angel and on my blog. State of the Union speeches, TED or specific libraries are recommended. Work must be your own work.
Due date is the day of the final exam.

I prefer this is a speech you attend in person, or one where you have full video and audio. In person provides far more opportunity to comment on environment and the full communication model. Critiquing an audio speech is allowed, but not one that you find only in print.



http://art-lynch.blogspot.com/2010/03/cbs-news-breakdown-of-where-house-sits.html