Donate Today! Help us help others.

Lynch Coaching

Translate

Sunday, March 18, 2012

The creative person...


"The creative person is both more primitive and more cultivated, more destructive, a lot madder and a lot saner, than the average person."

 ~ Frank Barron

'Mushing Mortician' Breathes Life Into Fallen Iditarod Sled Dog

A must listen to story...go to NPR for audio.  
by Ian Chillag

Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race rookie Scott Janssen, known as the "Mushing Mortician," of Anchorage, Alaska, poses for a photo with one of his pet dogs.
Enlarge Mark Thiessen/AP Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race rookie Scott Janssen, known as the "Mushing Mortician," of Anchorage, Alaska, poses for a photo with one of his pet dogs. 

From our "How To Do Everything" podcast:
Scott Janssen crossed the finish line of the Iditarod sled dog race on Friday afternoon, one dog short. He had hoped Marshall, who'd been with Janssen since he was a puppy, would be there.
They call Janssen "The Mushing Mortician," because when he's not racing the Iditarod, he owns a funeral home. A few days before the finish, he and his dogs were headed down a treacherous part of the course, the Dalzell Gorge. It was snowing, and the dogs were doing what they often do: dipping into the snow to hydrate as they run along. Everything was normal, until Marshall fell over.
"He must have packed his snout with snow when he [dipped]," Janssen says. "Much like when people are in an avalanche."
Janssen stopped his sled and ran to Marshall.
"He was dead. I'm an undertaker. I know death," he says.
Janssen closed up Marshall's mouth, and sucked the snow out of his snout. He then started breathing into his nose, and giving him chest compressions, as his other dogs watched and whined.
"I remember so vividly my tears dripping down on his snout as I looked up at the sky and I said 'Please God, please let him come back,'" he says. "I looked at Marshall, I breathed in his nose again, and I'm like 'Dude, please come back, please come back.'
"I did one more chest compression, one more breath into his nose, and he coughed back out, I mean, right into my mouth. Now it might sound disgusting to people, but it was the most joyous sensation ever," Janssen says.
Janssen and the other dogs rushed Marshall to the next Iditarod checkpoint in Rohn, Alaska, where the veterinarians checked him out. They're not sure exactly what happened to him out there, but they say he's going to be OK. He's resting at Janssen's home in Anchorage, awaiting the return of the human who saved his life.

Sign Language also have swear words and offensive messages

 From:CARLOS, AUBRORA
To:Lynch, Arthur
Subject:Cee-Lo F-U - Sign Language Final



WARNING
Do not use link if lanuguage offends you

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sv3tadz5Q3o
A link provided by my cousin, I would like to put out there first and foremost that there are some words in here that might be offensive to some, so please be aware before  clicking on the link. Sign language can be everymuch as passionate, energized and touching as  spoken language and I believe that  I have the video to prove it.

CSN Baseball Remaining Season Games...Catch some college ball!

Mar 23
Colorado Northwestern CC *
Morse Stadium
1 p.m. (DH) | Live
Mar 24
Colorado Northwestern CC *
Morse Stadium
Noon (DH) | Live
Mar 30
Utah State University-Eastern *
Price, UT
1 p.m. (DH)
Mar 31
Utah State University-Eastern *
Price, UT
Noon (DH)
Apr 6
Salt Lake Community College *
West Jordan, UT
1 p.m. (DH) | Live
Apr 7
Salt Lake Community College *
West Jordan, UT
Noon (DH) | Live
Apr 13
College of Southern Idaho *
Morse Stadium
1 p.m. (DH) | Live
Apr 14
College of Southern Idaho *
Morse Stadium
Noon (DH) | Live
Apr 20
Western Nevada College *
Carson City, NV
Noon (DH) | Live
Apr 21
Western Nevada College *
Carson City, NV
Noon (DH) | Live
Apr 27
Colorado Northwestern CC *
Rangely, CO
1 p.m. (DH)
Apr 28
Colorado Northwestern CC *
Rangely, CO
Noon (DH)
May 4
Utah State University-Eastern *
Morse Stadium
1 p.m. (DH) | Live
May 5
Utah State University-Eastern *
Morse Stadium
Noon (DH) | Live
 
POSTSEASON
 
 
May 9-12
Region XVIII Championships
SWAC Champion
 
May 17-19
Western District Championships
Region 18 Champion
 
May 26-Jun 2
Junior College World Series
Grand Junction, CO
 

Sunday Morning News and Views, Part II

Officials are grappling with a problem no one's sure how to solve: How do you tell if someone is too stoned to
drive?  States that allow medical marijuana have struggled with determining impairment levels for years. And voters in Colorado and Washington state will decide this fall whether to legalize the drug for recreational use, bringing a new urgency to the issue. Authorities envision a legal threshold for pot that would be comparable to the blood-alcohol standard used to determine drunken driving. But unlike alcohol, marijuana stays in the blood long after the high wears off a few hours after use, and there is no quick test to determine someone's level of impairment - not that scientists haven't been working on it.

It was a decade when tens of millions of people in the U.S. experienced mass unemployment and social upheaval as the nation clawed its way out of the Great Depression and rumblings of global war were heard from abroad. Now, intimate details of 132 million people who lived through the 1930s will be disclosed as the U.S. government releases the 1940 census records online for the first time on April 2. The records will be free and open to anyone on the Internet, but they won't immediately be name searchable.  For genealogists and family historians, the 1940 census release is the most important disclosure of ancestral secrets in a decade. Scholars expect the records to help draw a more detailed portrait of a transformative decade in American life.

Pope Benedict XVI has said the Catholic Church shares the pain of the Coptic Orthodox Church over the death of its patriarch, Pope Shenouda III. Benedict sent a message of condolences Sunday following Shenouda's death Saturday at age 88. Shenouda led Egypt's Christian minority for more than 40 years amid increasing tensions with Muslims. Benedict has called for greater protections for Egypt's estimated 10 million Christians amid a surge of recent attacks, but his message Sunday steered clear of polemics and focused on conveying his prayers for God's "faithful servant." Pope John Paul II met with Shenouda during his 2000 trip to Cairo and Pope Paul VI hosted Shenouda at the Vatican in 1973. 

Most people are familiar with the Underground Railroad that enabled escaped slaves find freedom in the North before the Civil War. But another underground railroad ran for a century and was headed in the other direction - south to what was then freedom for slaves in Spanish Florida. Escaped slaves from South Carolina headed south from almost the time the South Carolina colony was founded in 1670 until after the American Revolution. The end of the escape route came in 1790 when Spain stopped its policy of granting freedom to slaves who came to Florida and converted to Catholicism.  The southern leg of the Underground Railroad is the topic of a national conference being held in St. Augustine this June.
     
Heading into today's presidential primary in Puerto Rico, all four GOP hopefuls added delegates when results were finalized from contests that happened days ago.Mitt Romney added six delegates from Georgia's March 6 primary and Newt Gingrich added five. In Hawaii, which voted last week, Ron Paul added two delegates and Rick Santorum added one. The Georgia GOP says the final tally is Gingrich with 52 delegates, Romney with 21 and Santorum with three.  The Hawaii GOP says the final tally is Romney with nine delegates, Santorum with five and Paul with, three. Romney leads the overall race for delegates with 501. Santorum has 253, Gingrich has 136 and Paul has 50. It takes 1,144 delegates to win the nomination. There are 20 delegates up for grabs in Puerto Rico in a winner takes all primary race.

Rick Santorum says he's in the GOP presidential race for the long haul even though rival Mitt Romney has a big edge in delegates, campaign cash and organizational resources. Santorum tells CNN's "State of the Union" that "we're in this to win" and that there's too little difference between Romney and President Barack Obama to satisfy conservative Republicans. Santorum says conservatives want a chance to nominate a conservative to take on the Democratic incumbent and "we're going to give them an opportunity." The former Pennsylvania senator hasn't qualified for the ballot in all the states on the election calendar and sometimes has had trouble fielding full slates of delegates in some states. But he says he's doing pretty well with scarce resources, compared with the deep-pocketed Romney campaign.

Mitt Romney says President Barack Obama has failed in Afghanistan.The Republican presidential hopeful told "Fox News Sunday" that the president is partly to blame for the chaos there and should have been "more engaged" with military commanders and Afghan President Hamid Karzai. Romney has emerged as the only GOP candidate not to question the U.S. commitment in Afghanistan, even as polls show that most Americans want to end it. Administration officials say leaving behind a stable Afghanistan has been a top priority for the president. Obama plans to pull troops out by the end of 2014. Romney said any U.S. withdrawal should be determined by military commanders. At the same time, he said, Afghans should be taking more responsibility for security because "we're not going to stay there forever."
    
Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum says the United States should either commit to winning the war in Afghanistan or "get out." Santorum tells ABC's "This Week" that he agrees with rival Newt Gingrich that a commitment to "winning" means recognizing the U.S. will stay in Afghanistan "to finish the job." The former Pennsylvania senator says an effective U.S. role in the region may not mean the heavy military presence now in Afghanistan. He pointed to the few hundred U.S. troops that cleared the Taliban from local governments in some regions. Santorum promises to work with experts in the area to determine troop strength and with the Afghan government to ensure its success.

Afghanistan's ambassador to the United States says his country is committed to a long-term partnership with the U.S., but the road ahead may be full of bumps. The diplomat, Eklil Hakimi, says his government is an ally in the fight against terrorism and wants to make sure that terrorists cannot again use Afghanistan as a base to threaten the security of other countries. But a series of incidents has severely strained ties with the U.S. One was from the inadvertent burning of Qurans by U.S. soldiers. More recently, the war effort was driven to a new low by the killing of nine Afghan children and seven adults, allegedly by a U.S. soldier. The ambassador tells CNN's "State of the Union" that Afghanistan is working to define its relationship with the U.S. for the years to come, and that's the big picture. But he acknowledges that "down the road, it's a bumpy road." As for making sure the alleged shooter is brought to justice, Hakimi says "we trust the United States and we know how important this relationship is."

.

Kiefer Sutherland and Fans Furious as Fox Pulls Plug on '24' Movie


By Sharon Waxman
The Wrap

Kiefer Sutherland is furious at 20th Century Fox, which has called a halt to the movie version of his hit television show, “24,” over budget and star salary issues, TheWrap has learned.

The movie based on the conspiracy-terrorism-action show was in pre-production and set to start shooting next month, but has now ground to a halt because Fox will greenlight a budget no higher than $30 million, while Sutherland and producer Brian Grazer feel the budget needs to be in the low $40s at its tightest.


A Fox spokesman confirmed that the movie was on hold, and said it was related to timing.

"We're still working on a script, and hope to make [it] when Kiefer next has time," said the spokesman. "But this all came down to timing, and seven weeks is not enough time to prep a movie like this."
 
But insiders on the project refuted that version of the situation. According to them, the Fox television star feels insulted that Fox has offered him a relatively measly salary of $1 million to do the movie.  A Fox insider says that this fee was proposed, but it came in the context of negotiations over the fee, which is weighted toward a reward on the back end. In another round, the insider said, Fox offered $2 million.

Sutherland, who has helped Fox make hundreds of millions of dollars off the hit  show and is represented by CAA, wanted $5 million. (He is also the producer.)

Talks between the two sides continued up until the last 24 hours, with Fox co-chairman Tom Rothman getting involved, according to individuals with knowledge of the situation. One of those told TheWrap that the sides would be meeting via conference call on Wednesday to try to work out their differences, though that meeting was not confirmed by other participants.

Sutherland's agency CAA had no immediate comment, nor did his management.

The "24" budgeting problem may cause potential problems with the Fox Television Network, which needs Sutherland for its new television series, “Touch.” That show debuts March 22, and Sutherland recently returned from travelling abroad to promote it.

"24" was meant to go into production in April, when "Touch" went on hiatus, according to a television studio spokesman.

Now all of that has been thrown into question, and all of the talent attached is apparently  furious.
Overall, Sutherland ‘s impression was that “the studio didn’t seem to be paying attention or be consistent with notes and thoughts,” said one person in his camp. In other words, the guy feels dissed.


I know times are tough in this business, but I can’t quite figure out why Fox would nickel-and-dime a star like Sutherland, whose show has an international as well as a strong domestic audience.

Also read: Kiefer Sutherland: '24' Movie a Go This Year
Also read: Kiefer Sutherland's 'Touch': Watch a Sneak Preview Here (Video)

Sunday Morning News and Views, Part I

Hard to remember that it is still winter. At 7 AM local time it was 64 degrees at the beach in Chicago, where they had four 85 degree days in a row, the warmest on record and 35 degrees higher than normal. Warmer in Chicago than in Las Vegas. Tornado's, rain, and wind are pelting Hawaii today, and has been for the past four days. California, Nevada and Utah have been pelted with winds and fast downpours or snow at the higher elevations. All in all a very unusual national weather pattern for this point in March. Remember Spring does not begin until this coming Tuesday.



The difference between linear and open business models are under serious study by business programs at universities around the world. Linear thought, brought on by supply chain longitudinal models and a employer chain of command mentality hit full pace with Henry Ford and the Model T. That same model worked well for most of the 20th century. Computers only contributed to this linear thought, as flow chart driven programmers literally trained a generation that the way to gain results is through liner flow chart thinking. But researchers in Japan, Great Britain and her in the US, are finding that as computers break free of the keyboard centric box PC, entrepreneurs, sales and even distribution models are changing in major ways, evolving in a more end result and not linear routing model. How is this changing the way you think of how to get things done? Your view of the world?


It could be areas of recession driven post boom Las Vegas, as in one Madrid barrio, neighbors have converted a half-built, abandoned housing complex into a community garden. It's one way Spaniards are dealing with the leftovers of the construction boom -- land that was cleared for condos that never got built. Spain is littered with such spaces, where builders ran out of money mid-project. City planners are forced to get creative about what to do with potentially hazardous wrecks that are an eyesore, at best.

 Home prices have fallen throughout the US, and have plummeted in some states. It's making home ownership more affordable to many lower income families. These new borrowers are borrowing at today's low rates. But that doesn't mean that buying is always a better choice than renting. Some of the the challenges facing would-be, first-time home buyers  include stringent mortgage loan standards, requirements of higher income levels than may in this recession era can qualify for and record levels of student loan debt. Then too maintenance and other cost now fall on the homeowner instead of a landlord. Home ownership remains a way to add stability to a family, as families move less often, and all family members have a stake in making the home work. the number of 25 to 34 year olds who buy a first time home, is half of what it was ten years ago. Income is down, some of the American Dream has diminished, the pressure to leave the nest has gone down as well. Sales to other than investors are way down, as only investors can easily qualify for new home loans, making it harder for young Americans to cut through the maze and red tape and land a good deal on a home. Tax breaks and other incentives impact high income Americans more than young and lower Americans, as most Americans no longer can use an additional tax credit because they are already at the limit the government allows for their income level. So homes are now being added to the list of the rental market at every increasing numbers.


A new study that finds that voters tend to go for the candidate with the deeper voice.  A British Biological Research Journal did a study that found that listeners are more likely to vote for the deeper voice, regardless of their sex. But there are exceptions. Harry Reid has a high voice. Romey's voice is mellow and low compared to his competition. Candidates use vocal coaches to "enhance their electability."


Puerto Ricans are American citizens who do not vote in U.S. presidential general elections. But Puerto Ricans do participate in Republican and Democratic nominating contests. Tomorrow, Puerto Rico holds a Republican primary. Both Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney visited the island this week. Santorum stirred up controversy with his insistence that Puerto Rico make English its main language to qualify for U.S. statehood. Republicans in the state, according to polls, tend to agree with Santorum, despite his views. Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul did not campaign in the territory. Puerto Ricans are American Citizens by Act of Congress, but as a territory they haven no voting voice in Congress.

Residents of Illinois and Louisiana this week have been bombarded by TV ads attacking one or another presidential candidate, the vast majority of them ending with words like this: Welcome to the brave new world of presidential Super PACs, groups that walk and talk and run TV ads like a regular candidate's campaign, but legally have NOTHING to do with the candidate they support. The vast majority are for Romney and have names sounding patriotic and grass roots. This Tuesday night, we get a new look at these groups. At midnight, they must file a report with the Federal Election Commission detailing who gave them money, and how they spent it. It is expected that a good deal of PAC to PAC donations will be revealed, further veiling who the primary donors are. In this presidential race the Super PACS have pretty much become the race, doing all of the things traditional campaigns do. SuperPACS spend over 20 times the money that the actual campaigns pay. Unofficial links to PACS


Small donors are more likely to turn up at the polls or attend a caucus than the big money donors to SuperPACS. So far Obama leads in small donors, however, in addition to Super PAC funds, Romney has also build a sizable small donor base.

Soccer star Fabrice Muamba, a British Citizen born in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and brought to England as a young refugee child, is in critical condition this morning. Only23, he collapsed during a game suffering from a heart attack.


 Author Liza Mundy's new book, "The Richer Sex," explores how the role of "family breadwinner" has changed in recent years. As the economy has suffered, more women have replaced men as the primary earner. These changes are causing identity conflicts. Think of the pressure this can place on relationships, and on the other side of the coin how the role reversal can also be liberating for both men and women.