Donate Today! Help us help others.

Lynch Coaching

Translate

Saturday, June 12, 2010

Difficult Site Navigation?

"Difficult site navigation: During our review of your website, we found
your site difficult to navigate. Potential navigation issues include:
redirects, pages behind a login or restricted access, broken links,
excessive pop-ups, dialers, and pages under construction or not yet
launched."

I guess a resource that helps you find other resources is not what the web has evolved into. The expectation of web evaluation services is that you will be forced to remain on the website as long as possible (retention cume) instead of simply being the service my sites are designed to be.

What do you think?

How should I change my blogs and web site?

What do you like?

What causes you concern or problems?

Please let me now using comment below, or e-mail to art.lynch@artlynch.org

Writer, Director, Actor, Real World Spies




What do Ian Flemming and David Niven have in common?
True David Nivan played the "real James Bond" in the spoof 1966 Peter Sellers' version of "Casino Royale',  but their connection went far deeper than that. Fleming was the man behind the most sucessful slight of hand of World War II, convincing Germany that the Allies first fore into German occupied Europe in 1943. David Nivan (Pink Panther) was the MI6 officer who trained the "fake" General Montgomery to fool the Germans into believing, for the second time, that the Allies would invade southern France from North Africa, taking German attention away form the real invasion from England on D-Day in 1944.
Both men were spies involved in major spy victories of the Second World War.

The story of James Bond creator Flemmings part involves Operation Mincemeat (see see Weekend Edition below).

Nivan in a still classified North Africa "invasion force" . A professional impersonator 
Meyrick Clifton James was put under Nivan's tutelage (Nivan already successful as a film and stage actor in Endland, the US and Mexico, but that's a different story) for the fake army and later yet another diversion. 

and as member of the Phantom Signals Unit, which located and reported enemy positions, keeping read commanders up to date changing battle lines.

Wikipedia has these two intersting Nivan stories: "
About to lead his men into action, Niven eased their nervousness by telling them, "Look, you chaps only have to do this once. But I'll have to do it all over again in Hollywood with Errol Flynn!" Asked by suspicious American sentries during the Battle of the Bulge who had won the World Series in 1943, he answered "Haven't the foggiest idea . . . But I did co-star with Ginger Rogers in Bachelor Mother!"
Early in 1943, Allied forces were massing along the coast of North Africa, preparing to make a push across the Mediterranean. They’d settled on strategically important Sicily as a target… but they needed to convince the Germans that they were aiming somewhere else.
How did they do it? With a great deal of imagination, and the dead body of an unfortunate Welsh laborer who’d died from eating rat poison.
“The idea, very simply, was to get a dead body, equip the dead body with false papers, and then drop it somewhere the Germans would find it,” historian Ben Macintyre tells NPR’s Guy Raz. Macintyre is the author of the new book, Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory.
“It was probably the most elaborate, certainly one of the oddest, and certainly one of the most successful deception operations ever undertaken,” Macintyre says.

The idea for Operation Mincemeat came originally from Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond. Before he devoted his life to Agent 007, Fleming worked as an assistant to the head of British Naval Intelligence. And Fleming admitted freely that he’d lifted the idea of a dead body carrying false papers from a detective novel he’d once read.

Media Bias is Consumer Driven

"Most people...align themselves with whatever spin outlet seems comfortable."

-Wall Street Journal, May 7, 2004

HELP REQUESTED FOR NEXT STEP IN SERVING ACTORS IN NEVADA

I am looking for a web designer to join with me in forming a service for Nevada patterned along the lines of the Hawaii Actors Network. Please refer this post to anyone you think might help either on sharing revenue or as a donation (for a non-revenue generating site like this blog).

The network is one of many around the country that has grown to support actors and a local acting community. We need this in Nevada. I do not have the expertise or funds to do it on my own.

I can do heavy lifting on editorial, but not design and webmaster. They are outside of my expertise.

Please contact me at 702-454-1067 or art.lynch@artlynch.org.

Here is the address of the Hawaii network web site:
http://www.hawaiiactors.com

Note that colors, design and features are constantly evolving on this user based site.

Affordable Acting Courses this summer


June classes registering today. Acting and voice over all ages, all levels.

Ask about specials!

(702)
454-1067
or e-mail, 
click here
http://sagactor.blogspot.com/2010/04/summer-acting-classes-now-forming.html

Karzai Is Said to Doubt West Can Defeat Taliban



KABUL, Afghanistan — Two senior Afghan officials were showing President Hamid Karzai the evidence of the spectacular rocket attack on a nationwide peace conference earlier this month when Mr. Karzai told them that he believed the Taliban were not responsible.
Massoud Hossaini/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
In January, Hanif Atmar, then the interior minister of Afghanistan, gestured during a medal ceremony in Kabul. He and another top official have resigned from the Hamid Karzai government.
At War
Notes from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq and other areas of conflict in the post-9/11 era.

Related

Musadeq Sadeq/Associated Press
Afghanistan’s former intelligence chief, Amrullah Saleh, in Kabul on Wednesday. He also resigned his position.
“The president did not show any interest in the evidence — none — he treated it like a piece of dirt,” said Amrullah Saleh, then the director of the Afghan intelligence service.
Mr. Saleh declined to discuss Mr. Karzai’s reasoning in more detail. But a prominent Afghan with knowledge of the meeting, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that Mr. Karzai suggested in the meeting that it might have been the Americans who carried it out.
Minutes after the exchange, Mr. Saleh and the interior minister, Hanif Atmar, resigned — the most dramatic defection from Mr. Karzai’s government since he came to power nine years ago. Mr. Saleh and Mr. Atmar said they quit because Mr. Karzai made clear that he no longer considered them loyal.
But underlying the tensions, according to Mr. Saleh and Afghan and Western officials, was something more profound: That Mr. Karzai had lost faith in the Americans and NATO to prevail in Afghanistan.
For that reason, Mr. Saleh and other officials said, Mr. Karzai has been pressing to strike his own deal with the Taliban and the country’s archrival, Pakistan, the Taliban’s longtime supporter. According to a former senior Afghan official, Mr. Karzai’s maneuverings involve secret negotiations with the Taliban outside the purview of American and NATO officials.
“The president has lost his confidence in the capability of either the coalition or his own government to protect this country,” Mr. Saleh said in an interview at his home. “President Karzai has never announced that NATO will lose, but the way that he does not proudly own the campaign shows that he doesn’t trust it is working.”
People close to the president say he began to lose confidence in the Americans last summer, after national elections in which independent monitors determined that nearly one million ballots had been stolen on Mr. Karzai’s behalf. The rift worsened in December, when President Obama announced that he intended to begin reducing the number of American troops by the summer of 2011.
“Karzai told me that he can’t trust the Americans to fix the situation here,” said a Western diplomat in Kabul, who spoke on condition of anonymity. “He believes they stole his legitimacy during the elections last year.