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Monday, April 26, 2010

Creativity

“The creative person is both more primitive and more cultivated, more destructive, a lot madder and a lot saner, than the average person.”


~ Frank Barron

GAMEWORKS HONORS THE MILITARY WITH FREE GAME PLAY


Press Release:

In a continued effort to show support for the men and women who defend our freedom, GameWorks Las Vegas is now hosting a Military Appreciation Night on the last Friday of every month. GameWorks will kick off “Military Night” on Friday, April 30th between the hours of 7-10pm by offering a free 3-hour game card to anyone who shows their active or retired military identification. “We are honored and very appreciative of the support GameWorks is showing to our men and women in the armed services” says Cate Berry, Director of Marketing for Nellis Air Force Base. “We encourage everyone to take advantage of this great offer”.

GameWorks is a full-service restaurant, bar and arcade, featuring the most advanced video game technology provided by parent company, Sega Entertainment. The variety of game genres include combat, racing, music and dance, simulators, billiards and more. GameWorks Director of Sales, Mark Wiley, says “Nothing builds camaraderie better than a couple hours of showing off your shooting or driving skills. I’m sure the competition level will be high on Friday night.” With the lowest happy-hour prices on The Strip and deeply discounted party packages, GameWorks Las Vegas is considered fun and affordable entertainment that appeals to just about everyone.

Free game cards will be available for all active and retired military and a guest from 7pm – 10pm on Friday, April 30th. GameWorks Las Vegas is located at 3785 Las Vegas Blvd South in the Showcase Mall. Parking is available at the Showcase Mall or at surrounding hotels. Fore more information about Military Night, contact the GameWorks sales office at 702.895.7626 ext. 203.

###
For media information and photos, please contact:
Mark Wiley
702.895.7626, ext. 203
Nellis Air Force Base Contact:
Cate Berry
702.652.8751

The future as Seen from the past

A portable personal phone that involved wearing an umbrella like object on your head was predicted in the Washington Post in 1910, titled "your own wireless telephone." The article did predict that the housewife of the future would call the husband and ask they to "stop at the butcher shop." This is just one vision of the future reflected in a story on All Things Considered.

In 1978, when Newspapers were riding high, "The Futurist" magazine predicted a device like an iPad or Kindle. GPS involved big boxes and a global positioning service in cartoons from the Chicago Tribune. Flat screen televisions were shown in the late 1970's and early 80's with wall screens in movies including "Total Recall". Even the old black and white movie theater "Flash Gordon" serials had Ming the Merciless watching his minions on cameras and talking to them on two way televisions.

Those old enough remember "Tomorrowland" as it existed at Disneyland in the 1960's and 1970's and the City of the Future at the New York World's Fair. Wonderful, some prophitic and much pathetic, but all interesting

Automobiles that drive themselves by talking with the road.

Meetings by video phones were predicted in the 1920's.

Matt Novak blogs about retro-tech on paleo-future.

The Man Who Built the Hoover Dam

Art Lynch as Frank Crowe, the engineer who built the dam [HQ]

2:09
One man show performed the fall of 2009 as part of the Boulder City 31ers celebration. This is a small part of a show that varied in length and was performed for 31ers, civic groups, schools and general audiences. Researched and written by my wife Laura and myself.

Why does it take so long to finish college?

From The New York Times: Freakanomics:

American college students, particularly male students, have been slower and slower to finish college over the past 30 years.  A new working paper by John BoundMichael F. Lovenheim, and Sarah Turner suggests the trend is due to rising costs of education.  Demographics and academic preparedness don’t explain the trend, but the authors found evidence in support of the increasing cost hypothesis: both increasing student-faculty ratios and cohort size are linked to increasing time-to-degree, particularly in “non-top 50 public sector” schools.  The authors also found that students are working more hours in response to rising costs.  Low-income students and students at less-selective institutions are particularly vulnerable to the trend.

Brought to you by unions: The Weekends

How unions, church, synagogs and and anti-union industrialist brought us weekends.


http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2009/09/04/pm-history-of-the-weekend




At this time of high stakes for all workers,  ten percent unemployment nationally, top heavy home mortgages and sharp political divides in Congress, it may be good to step back and think about the bigger picture of who we are as we do out jobs and go to work.


Consider the role performed by the American Labor Movement.

As you enjoy your weekend, most Americans will not even give a thought to what Labor Day represents or the weekend that precedes it.

http://www.dol.gov/OPA/ABOUTDOL/LABORDAY.HTM



And remember those who died in Haymarket Square

http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h750.html


Plus actions you can take today....

http://www.aflcio.org

http://www.examiner.com/x-11073-Tampa-Workplace-Examiner~y2009m9d5-17-things-that-labor-union-would-like-for-Labor-Day

Back to the Classics

The pendulum is shifting back, as classical radio makes a come back, this time from its old friend, Public Radio. The New York Times reports on that trend:

Classical Music’s Comeback, on Public Radio

Just 19 commercial classical stations remain on the air nationwide, by one count, down from about 50 in the early 1990s. But as ad-supported programmers also decide that the classical format is no longer practical, the music has started to find a new savior. And, to the surprise of many, it is public broadcasting.
In New York, WNYC did not win fans in the classical world when, in April 2002, it dropped music from its day hours on the FM station, substituting public affairs talk shows.
So there was some trepidation among classical radio listeners when WNYC bought the commercial classical station WQXR from The New York Times Company last year.

Free B Movie TONIGHT from a Cult Film Classic Director

April 26 Ted Mikels Grindhouse Reunion


Ted Mikels' Grindhouse Reunion: Double Feature World Premiere Free Admission!

On April 26, veteran Hollywood filmmaker Ted V. Mikels will unleash his latest gang of demented mutants on a new generation of grindhouse movie fans in Las Vegas, Nevada. "Where better to have a world premiere for ASTRO ZOMBIES M3:Cloned than in one of the most glamorous locations in the world?" asked Mikels. "The mutant clones are going totally first class this time! Plus, admission will be free to the public." The iconic horror movie-maker is best known for his 1971 film, The Corpse-Grinders. He also filmed the first zombie movie ever shot in color – the original ASTRO ZOMBIES in 1969, starring John Carradine and Wendell Corey. Mikels is also well-known for creating unusual promotional activity surrounding the release of his films, and this event will prove to be no exception. TVM Global Entertainment has announced that the premiere is being billed as the Ted V. Mikels' Grindhouse Reunion.

Mikels will treat his grindhouse fans to two pre-release director's cuts, offering them a double feature on premiere night. The world premiere of Astro Zombies M3: Cloned will open the show, followed by Mikels' 2009 film Demon Haunt.

The high cost of abolishing "Obama-care"

"Overturn Obama Care" is troubling as a slogan to small insurance companies, who have already spent billions (cumulatively) preparing for health care reforms, and will need to spend even more if they need to change into reverse. They also see the advantages for smaller insurers of the new law as it levels the playing field, adds a new pool or relatively healthy citizens to the pool, and provides protections for insurance companies if the new laws provide too much of a short term hardship.

Larger companies can afford to shift gears and see the short term advantage of raising rates and bringing in huge profits in the time between the bills passage and dates when various provisions of the bill take effect. The are in a win-win situation, profiting and operating no matter which way the wind blows.

Those with pre-existing conditions (including simply being a woman or of a certain age) fear that they will lose the hard fought "must carry" and "no limit on life time coverage",

Many doctors groups, including the AMA, favor the new health care plans, but individual doctors and for-profit corporations oppose it, as it will limit what they can charge and require coverage of those who in the past they could deny services to or pass on to government run or subsidized hospitals.

Small hospitals benefit from "Obamacare" while large hospital corporations see losses in revenue.

Obama care is not national health care of the government taking over health care but regulation and legal guidelines imposed to ensure health care to the overall pool or Americans rather than just those who can afford it. That said, there is red tape and may be even more added where some feel there should be none.

Can the marketplace ensure everyone evenly and fairly?

Should the wealth or employed have a right to far better health care and therefore a better survival rate/

Should the poor or unemployed put a higher priority on health care and if so how would you have them pay for it given the need for food, shelter and basic living standards?

So...should it be overturned, as was the banner for so may who voted in this month's election?

-Sources: PRI's Marketplace, National Public Radio's Morning Edition, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, the Nation. Atlantic.

Published 11-9-2010

Tweet anyone lately?

"I find myself happy the public library system already exist. Imagine how hard it would be to get that one past congress."

"Man on the moon, troops in Afghanistan, instant messaging, why no universal health?"

"If socialism is wrong, then don't drive on roads, use public bathrooms or accept social security."

"The attack on Acorn strike me as funny, two offices out of 70, 4 people out of thousands and wham!"

"One man's opinion is another man's spam."

"Keep and open mind in an uncertain world"

"Do not equate negotiation and compromise with weakness"

"One thing about being a baby boomer is you are never alone, got a problem, a million others have it."

"If the answer is tax cuts, then why have taxes?"

A few tweets from NPR listeners.

The first three has me relate back to how hit teams are creating news, news given greater attentions and value then they deserve...in other words people want negative, hate and things that get them fired up in confirmation of what they already believe: Story Behind the Story


Of course the entire issue of Tweeting as a communication media comes into real focus for this course and for COM 102, the Interpersonal Communication course.


http://twitter.com/

Voice tweeting:

Twitter in English (You Tube video)


Do you tweet?

What would you tweet about today?

What are your feelings on the issues they tweeted on?

Do you use Twitter? If you do, why? If you do not, why not?

Is Twitter a legitmate new communication media that can work for business?

Is Twitter a media that will stand the test of time?

Will Twitter replace voice mail, e-mail, IM or text messaging?

Should Twitter be added to Communication coursework? If now why? If so, why?

So, what do you think?

(first posted 9-21-2009)

Take Charge

“Take charge of your life by defining your place in the world instead of letting the world define you. Know very clearly who you are and believe in yourself.” 


—Mike Pniewski

Avatar #1 DVD

"Avatar" is already the number on DVD release of the year,  four days after its Earth Day release, and without any special extra material or 3D. That's according to the Hollywood Reporter, which reports:


Consumers snapped up 6.7 million copies of the first "Avatar" DVDs 
and Blu-ray Discs, which are 2D versions of the action fantasy 
offering no bonus features. "Avatar" sales quickly have 
outpaced the 6.5 million units sold of Summit/Universal's 
"The Twilight Saga: New Moon," which had been 
2010's hottest disc release to date.

Fox Home Entertainment began selling the "Avatar" discs 
Thursday to coincide with Earth Day. The James Cameron 
epic marked a format record by moving 1.5 million 
Blu-ray copies in its first day on store shelves.


FHE will release special edition versions of the 
James Cameron epic in the fourth quarter, with 
those versions set to include special features 
of the sort normally included on home 
entertainment discs. A 3D Blu-ray version
of "Avatar" will be released early next year.

Obama Zombies

From the New York Times Best Sellers list. Needless to day I did not buy this, but the cover is cool.