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Friday, March 19, 2010

Another US War in Mexico?

Clear and Present Danger

In Tom Clancy's novel "A Clear and Present Danger" the fictional president of the US allows the US to enter a black ops war against drugs in Columbia, following the murder of an American family at sea. No win real life Americans, including for the first time ever an American government official, to be tortured and murdered in Mexico by Narco-gangsters. In life following fiction the US Government has declaired a clear and present danger and a threat to our national security tied to event sin Mexico.

Next Week the US Secretary of State, Attorney General and top Homeland Security Officials will meet with their Mexican counterparts at an emergency summit in Mexico City. Massive US aid, additional FBI, Immigration and US Homeland Security forces will be activated in Mexico itself, military training and possibly joint operations discussed and billions poured into fighting the Mexican drug cartels.

Mexican Narco interests have saturated American cities as far north as Washington state and as far east as Washington DC. Atalanta and Phoenix are major Mexican drug hubs. Assasinations and kidnappings of Mexican nationals and joint US-Mexican citizens have taken place here in Las Vegas, in Texas, in Chicago and in rural Maine. The cartels have been operating with increased violence and disregard for the law in both the US and Mexico.

The US has a travelers advisory for all of Mexico and "do not travel" warnings for Americans to boarder towns and several popular Mexican resorts due to open gang on gang, or gang on government warfare in the streets.

Despite the US having invaded Mexico three times in our history, and fought the Mexican War, we are now allies and friends. The friendship may be taxed in the months ahead.

Hollywood focus at CES


Peek Into Future at CES




Editors note: I am the National co-chair of  New Technologies and am on the New Media Task Force of the Screen Actors Guild. As a SAG member I attend the CES here in Las Vegas on behalf of the committee. This year, with a focus on Hollywood and New Media, many of the top officers, other board members and key SAG staff members attended as well. This is their report to be published in the Screen Actor Magazine.

The Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas remains the granddaddy of all media and electronics shows. 

In January, 113,000 attendees representing 140 countries elbowed their way to get close to thousands of new products, 20,000 of which were new product launches. In an exhibition area equal to 32 football fields, the Guild had a team of staff on the ground at CES from the Contracts, New Media, and Research and Economics departments to attend and speak on panels, to research and report on the trade show, and to develop business opportunities for actors.

Throughout CES, SAG representatives met with new media producers, agency representatives, distributors, advertisers, financiers, producers and deal-makers to learn from them and to educate others about the Guild, our members and our contracts.

“At CES we continued our development of ongoing relationships as well as forging new ones with the people that create projects that utilize our members,” said Mark Friedlander, national director of New Media for SAG. “While at the same time, the industry professionals were there looking at the same new technologies and wondering how they could exploit them for their profit.”

“Our priority was distilling this incredible amount of input from a purely technological viewpoint to a viewpoint that sheds light on where and how our members can earn a living, and if these technologies and the business models that accompany them are today’s reality or somewhere beyond tomorrow,” said Tom LaGrua, SAG Contracts executive director. “If it is beyond today then how long will that future take to get here? Perhaps it already has.” 

3D technology and handheld mobile viewing devices were definitely hyped at CES, but a highlight of the show was five days of panel discussions on new technology and business by industry leaders, content producers, analysts, visionaries and even actors. Social media, branded entertainment, over-the-top content delivery, business models, metrics, in-car technology, new advertising models and measurements, and wireless technology were hot topics.

SAG National 1st VP Anne-Marie Johnson spoke on the panel “Predictions and Opportunities for Media Monetization” in the UpNext conference at CES. The group, which included representatives from Sony, Nielsen, LG and the American Association of Advertising Agencies, among others, discussed trends in new media, business models, ratings data, fair compensation for performers and outlooks for next year.
SAG’s Friedlander spoke on the “Content Distribution: Artists and Rights Holders-P2P for Content Creators” panel along with others from BMI and law firm Loeb & Loeb. They discussed challenges for distribution, compensation and licensing.

With so many important panels, said LaGrua, “the key to cutting through the information overload and finding value in a ream of notes is listening for repetitive themes and insights.”

Among these themes, LaGrua reported, were:  

Apps: Apps, or applications, come of age. These downloadable programs are designed to expand the functionality of a mobile device, and delivery platforms can include games, business tools and premium content for free or for a fee. It is a viable vehicle for premium content sites to partner with successful apps to broaden their reach and to make money.

Reverse Content Windowing: A new business model has emerged that moves in the opposite direction from traditional media. In a traditional exploitation of a television show, the path generally begins on a broadcast network and moves to cable to home video (DVD) to digital download (electronic sell through) to online exhibition. Reverse Content Windowing works, well, in reverse. Starting online, moving to digital download to home video to cable to broadcast, pay TV and international TV. We now know of a handful of instances where this has occurred. The success of this model is still uncertain at this time, however, “we should hope for its success,” said LaGrua. “With success for this model SAG members can benefit from residuals formulas on platforms that up until now haven’t existed.”

Branded Entertainment: If Mr. Peabody did have a Wayback Machine, then this is it and he brought back with him the 1950s television business model of ad-supported celebrity-driven “premium content.” Premium content is scripted content in which Screen Actors Guild members perform. Think Ozzie and Harriet or the Texaco Star Theater. Producers are using this model for made-for-new media productions. Ad agencies are huge players in this environment, partnering celebrity-driven premium content with an appropriate advertiser. Agents are also packaging their talent with brands they represent.
Ben Silverman, former head of NBC and creator of the NBC Digital Studio has created Electus, a new media content studio. Electus and Yahoo are partnering to develop and produce exclusive premium content for Yahoo and its advertising partners. Silverman’s objective is to produce branded entertainment for Yahoo users, giving advertisers new opportunities to integrate their brand messages into the next generation of online programming.

This creates the necessity for clarity at Screen Actors Guild in answering this most critical question: Are these entertainment projects or are they commercials? “Ad-supported premium content can easily blur the line between these two areas,” said LaGrua, “but be assured that your Contracts department staff will continue to ensure that, in this new media landscape, all projects are being produced under the appropriate contract.”

“CES can always be counted on to highlight where the world of technology and the entertainment industry find common ground on which to build their business, while holding out the possibilities for the future,” added Friedlander. “It is in this environment that we need to always start with the question: how will this affect the members of Screen Actors Guild?”

See also: CES in Las Vegas

Countdown on Health Care for all

No matter how you may feel about Keith Olberman, the reality is that he has been dealing with his father's illness and all of the complications it has caused in life. He gave a one hour commentary of health care from his vary personal perspective, in reserved tones and without the bombast his viewers tend to tune in for. I highly recommend you view this video at: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3036677/#33217642

This morning President Obama entered the final stretch in his push for Health Care Reform. His speech may be accessed here: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2010/03/19/i-still-believe-we-can-do-whats-right?utm_source=email45&utm_medium=image&utm_campaign=healthreform

If you are in my COM 101 class, these programs can be used to fulfill your extra credit assignment.

Who is running Washington. Not Mr. Smith.



Who is in running the Senate?
The Filibuster is not what it use to be, nor was it ever what we see and feel from “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”. The Filibuster was used by southerners to defeat and delay anti lynching laws, civil rights legislation and protects special interests. The reality is that the filibuster was rare, once or twice a decade. By the 1950’s it surfaced once or twice a session, in the 1960’s maybe a half dozen times a year. In the 2007-2008 Legislative sessions, Republicans waged 112 filibusters after Democrats retook the house and senate. And the reality is that the “Mr. Smith” image no longer applies, as no single individual has to keep the floor, nor does anyone have to keep talking. It’s all procedural. The procedure had taken us from majority rule, regardless of which party is in power, to 60% rule in the Senate. It also has contributed to the time and frequency of unrelated add ons to Senate bills, having little or nothing to do with the original intent of the legislation. In effect the filibuster, along with big dollars and cost of running for office, have led to our continuous election cycle.
In 2005 a few GOP senators wanted to restore simple majority rule. Both parties soundly defeated that effort, because both parties know that today’s majority party could be the minority in the future. Both want to maintain the control of the minority Republicans now use in record numbers and to record crippling effect. Both parties know that the people do not understand what a filibuster actually is, so come elections any inaction will be blamed on the majority party, regardless of what actually happened. Republicans are counting on that to reverse who is in the majority after November a to cripple the current president.

And when did this country change from a representational democracy where the majority of representatives determined law and governed, with the public having a check and balance called elections? When did 60% become a majority? When did procedural votes, still representing one more than 50% of the votes in the "yea" become "undemocratic?"

Shades of George Orwell's "1984" and "double speak". Its not the vote but unscientific and often slanted polls that determine "majority", polls of citizens who do not listen to both sides of a debate, sit through argumentation, see all the documents or take part in all of the meetings. Again, the founding father's set up a representational democracy for a reason.

The consent agenda and other methods of using simple majority rule are also falling into disfavor, as whatever power is out of power cries murder and claims the lack of populist support for any bill that does not get a full hearing and full vote. Both sides know full well that if every bill had full hearing then there would be no time to get anything done and government would grind to a hault.

Which is what has happened.

But both sides rely on the simplistic ignorance of the public on procedural norms to sell their case self righteously and always with an eye toward the next election rather than doing what they were hired to do, actually govern.
Yes, Americans remain blissfully ignorant, thanks in part to Jimmy Stewart’s Mr. Smith, and idealistic about the intended role of our government, no matter how they feel about current politicians or political parties.
Photos: American Film Institute. James Stewart's performance in Frank Capra's MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON (1939) helped cement his image as the decent, honest Everyman, and won him his first Oscar(r) nomination.
(this was posted 3-14-2010 as part of Sunday Morning News and Views)

China: Google out, Microsoft in?

The Health Care debate is not the only big one going this weekend. At Google decisions on the future, if any, of their Chinese operations will be made.

An announcement is expected this Monday on whether Google will pull out of China.  Bloomberg News is reporting April 10th may be the day Google withdraws operations from China. Google has not officially made any announcement, but the question seems to be shifting from if to when, the search giant will walk away from the largest and fastest growing online market on the planet.

Meanwhile Microsoft has reported that its search engine "Bing!" is set to be named the official search engine of China (under 52% government ownership and control). Industry sources report that, unlike Google, Microsoft sees dollars and power as reasons to give up on basic American values of "free speech" and the Internet's founding principals of open information access. The selective method used for Bing! also makes it able steer those using the engine to specific "priority" merchants or information sites.

China, the other super power

China has now bypassed Germany as the number one high tech exporter. The Red Nation is now tied with the US as the world's overall exporter. While not there yet, they are well on the way to being the largest internal consumer of Chinese products as well.

China has kept its currency value artificially low, something both the US Congress and the International Bank have called into question as creating an artificial trade imbalance, feeding China's goal of being the international business and manufacturing center of the world for the 21st century.

Meanwhile China continues alleged human rights violations in its provinces and Tibet, discriminating against and systematically seeking to wipe out the cultures of minorities. During the Olympics cleaned up versions of regional groups were portrayed by Chinese who were not even part of the ethnic or cultural groups represented. Protests of any kind were banned.

China openly uses censorship, sending Google into retreat over basic issues of human rights and open communication (while Microsoft and BING are more than glad to step in and agree to censorship and other practices).

Cyber attacks have been launched against our military, Wall Street and international businesses based out of China, with those allegedly behind the attacks lauded instead of punished by the Chinese government


So is this truly the US Century?

Is a superpower only defined by military might?

And what of the Republic of China, which we are forced to call by its geographical name of Taiwan? Mainland China, the People's Republic of China, has indicated it is willing to use military force to "retake" what is theirs.


First Posted 9-10-09, revised 03-19-10

Principles for the Teacher of Adults teaching adults. It's important to know how adults learn. Malcolm Knowles, a pioneer in the study of adult learning, observed that adults learn best when: 1. They understand why something is important to know or do. 2. They have the freedom to learn in their own way. 3. Learning is experiential. 4. The time is right for them to learn. 5. The process is positive and encouraging. Principle 1: Make Sure Your Adult Students Understand “Why” Most adult students are in your classroom because they want to be. Some of them are there because they have Continuing Education requirements to keep a certificate current, but most are there because they’ve chosen to learn something new. This principle is not about why your students are in your classroom, but about why each thing you teach them is an important part of the learning. I’ll use my own pickle­making lesson as an example. When I learned to make pickles, my teacher and neighbor, Marilyn, explained: It’s important to soak the cucumbers in ice water over night. This helps make the pickles crisp. If you put a towel under the jars in the canner, they won’t bounce against each other and break. When sterilizing the jars, it’s important to fill each at least halfway with water, AND fill the canner they’re sitting in with water. Too little water and the towel mentioned in the previous bullet will catch on fire. You know this kind of information comes from experience. Principle 2: Respect that Your Students Have Different Learning Styles There are three general learning styles: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. Visual learners rely on pictures. They love graphs, diagrams, and illustrations. “Show me,” is their motto. They often sit in the front of the classroom to avoid visual obstructions and to watch you, the teacher. They want to know what the subject looks like. You can best communicate with them by providing handouts, writing on the white board, and using phrases like, “Do you see how this works?” Auditory learners listen carefully to all sounds associated with the learning. “Tell me,” is their motto. They will pay close attention to the sound of your voice and all of its subtle messages, and they will actively participate in discussions. You can best communicate with them by speaking clearly, asking questions, and using phrases like, “How does that sound to you?” Kinesthetic learners need to physically do something to understand it. Their motto is “Let me do it.” They trust their feelings and emotions about what they’re learning and how you’re teaching it. They want to actually touch what they’re learning. They are the ones who will get up and help you with role playing. You can best communicate with them by involving volunteers, allowing them to practice what they’re learning, and using phrases like, “How do you feel about that?” Pickle Example: I’m generally a kinesthetic learner. Marilyn talked to me about her pickling process, explaining why she uses the ingredients she does, and showed me how she dips a liquid measuring cup into the hot brine and pours it into the jar using a wide­mouthed funnel, but my greatest learning came when I fumbled through the second jar all by myself. Most people use all three styles while they’re learning, and of course, this is logical since we all have five senses, barring any disabilities, but one style almost always is preferred. The big question is, “How do you, as the teacher, know which student has which learning style?” Without training in neuro­linguistics, it might be difficult, but conducting a short learning style assessment at the beginning of your class would benefit you and the students. This information is as valuable to the student as it is to you. Free Continuing Education Newsletter! Sign Up Discuss in my forum The teacher of adults has a different job from the one who teaches children. If you're teaching adult students, it's important to understand the five principles of Teaching Adult Learners By Deb Peterson, About.com Guide Enter email address There are several learning style assessments available online, some better than others. I like the one at Ageless Learner. adulted.about.com/od/teachers/a/teachingadults.htm 1/2 3/19/13 Teacher - 5 Principles for the Teacher of Adults Share your thoughts about learning styles. Principle 3: Allow Your Students to Experience What They’re Learning Experience can take many forms. Any activity that gets your students involved makes the learning experiential. This includes small group discussions, experiments, role playing, skits, building something at their table or desk, writing or drawing something specific – activity of any kind. Activities also keep people energized, especially activities that involve getting up and moving about. The other aspect of this principle is honoring the life experiences your students bring to the classroom. Be sure to tap into that wealth of wisdom whenever it’s appropriate. You’ll have to be a good timekeeper because people can talk for hours when asked for personal experiences, but the extra facilitation needed will be well worth the gems your students have to share. Pickle Example: Once Marilyn had shown me how to prepare one jar, she busied herself in the kitchen doing her own thing, close enough to keep an eye on me and to answer my questions, but allowing me the autonomy to go at my own speed. When I made mistakes, she didn’t interfere unless I asked. She gave me the space and the time to correct them on my own. Top Related Searches Different Learning Styles Visual Learners Visual Obstructions Malcolm Knowles Teaching Adults Adult Students 



Principles for the Teacher of Adults from About.com

Teaching adults. It's important to know how adults learn.


Malcolm Knowles, a pioneer in the study of adult learning, observed that adults learn best when:

1. They understand why something is important to know or do. 2. They have the freedom to learn in their own way.
3. Learning is experiential.
4. The time is right for them to learn.

5. The process is positive and encouraging.

Principle 1: Make Sure Your Adult Students Understand “Why”

Most adult students are in your classroom because they want to be. Some of them are there because they have Continuing Education requirements to keep a certificate current, but most are there because they’ve chosen to learn something new.

This principle is not about why your students are in your classroom, but about why each thing you teach them is an important part of the learning. I’ll use my own pickle­making lesson as an example.


When I learned to make pickles, my teacher and neighbor, Marilyn, explained:

It’s important to soak the cucumbers in ice water over night. This helps make the pickles crisp.

If you put a towel under the jars in the canner, they won’t bounce against each other and break.


When sterilizing the jars, it’s important to fill each at least halfway with water, AND fill the canner they’re sitting in with water. Too little water and the towel mentioned in the previous bullet will catch on fire. You know this kind of information comes from experience.

Principle 2: Respect that Your Students Have Different Learning Styles

There are three general learning styles: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic.


Visual learners rely on pictures. They love graphs, diagrams, and illustrations. “Show me,” is their motto. They often sit in the front of the classroom to avoid visual obstructions and to watch you, the teacher. They want to know what the subject looks like. You can best communicate with them by providing handouts, writing on the white board, and using phrases like, “Do you see how this works?”


Auditory learners listen carefully to all sounds associated with the learning. “Tell me,” is their motto. They will pay close attention to the sound of your voice and all of its subtle messages, and they will actively participate in discussions. You can best communicate with them by speaking clearly, asking questions, and using phrases like, “How does that sound to you?”


Kinesthetic learners need to physically do something to understand it. Their motto is “Let me do it.” They trust their feelings and emotions about what they’re learning and how you’re teaching it. They want to actually touch what they’re learning. They are the ones who will get up and help you with role playing. You can best communicate with them by involving volunteers, allowing them to practice what they’re learning, and using phrases like, “How do you feel about that?”


Pickle Example: I’m generally a kinesthetic learner. Marilyn talked to me about her pickling process, explaining why she uses the ingredients she does, and showed me how she dips a liquid measuring cup into the hot brine and pours it into the jar using a wide­mouthed funnel, but my greatest learning came when I fumbled through the second jar all by myself.


Most people use all three styles while they’re learning, and of course, this is logical since we all have five senses, barring any disabilities, but one style almost always is preferred.


The big question is, “How do you, as the teacher, know which student has which learning style?” Without training in neuro­linguistics, it might be difficult, but conducting a short learning style assessment at the beginning of your class would benefit you and the students. This information is as valuable to the student as it is to you.


The teacher of adults has a different job from the one who teaches children. If you're teaching adult students, it's important to understand the five principles of

Principle 3: Allow Your Students to Experience What They’re Learning
Experience can take many forms. Any activity that gets your students involved makes the learning experiential. This includes small group discussions, experiments, role playing, skits, building something at their table or desk, writing or drawing something specific – activity of any kind. Activities also keep people energized, especially activities that involve getting up and moving about.


The other aspect of this principle is honoring the life experiences your students bring to the classroom. Be sure to tap into that wealth of wisdom whenever it’s appropriate. You’ll have to be a good timekeeper because people can talk for hours when asked for personal experiences, but the extra facilitation needed will be well worth the gems your students have to share.


Pickle Example: Once Marilyn had shown me how to prepare one jar, she busied herself in the kitchen doing her own thing, close enough to keep an eye on me and to answer my questions, but allowing me the autonomy to go at my own speed. When I made mistakes, she didn’t interfere unless I asked. She gave me the space and the time to correct them on my own.


Top Related Searches Different Learning Styles Visual Learners Visual Obstructions Malcolm Knowles Teaching Adults Adult Students

Michael Toole's "Reeling": a short film



A friend of mine, Michael Toole, wrote, produced and starred in the short film "Reeling" , that has earned awards from Boulder City to France, South Africa to Japan. The short contains language and some graphic images of a bloody mouth. It is dark comedy and again, has won awards.

http://www.facebook.com/#!/video/video.php?v=147286865967&ref=mf

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=147286865967 

And in his latest film, "Spotters", both as an actor and writer..


He is interested in your feedback.

CBS News breakdown of where the house sits on health care

One way or another health care, and the future for congressional members living in districts either dominated by the opposite party or where races are tight, may be decided.  This report from CBS news is the most up to date on who stands where. Note that Henderson, Boulder City, rural Clark County Congressional District 3 Representative Dina Titus is undecided. She has been wavering based on the group or organization she is talking to or the way the wind blows, as can be seen in this November 4 story in the Las Vegas Sun.  and update from yesterday's newspaper...

Regardless of your view, now is the time to contact Titus and let her know where you stand and why. Phone calls generally carry more weight than written signed letters, which carry more weight than personal e-mail, which carries more weight than mass e-mails that special interested groups have set up for your signature or "easy" transmission.

The Hunt for Health Care Votes: Democrats to Watch

Updated March 19, 11 a.m. ET

Today is the day the clock starts running. After Democrats posted their health bill online this afternoon, there is a seventy-two hour countdown until House Democrats bring it up for a vote Sunday afternoon. The Democrats' whip team will be busy in that seventy-two hours furiously counting the votes, twisting arms and convincing some of their skeptical members to support the health care bill.
Speaker Nancy Pelosi can only afford to lose thirty-seven Democrats if every Republican votes against the bill. CBS News will be measuring the whip team's progress.
Here's who to watch:
Vulnerable Democrats: Thirty-seven members who are either on the fence, or a firm no, represent districts that will be the most competitive this November according to a CBS News analysis. This vote on health care could determine whether they have a job next year. Anti-abortion Democrats: Watch Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.) who has said he has twelve members who would vote against the health care bill if the Senate abortion language is not changed to make sure no federal funds pay for abortions.
Blue Dogs: Of the thirty-nine Democrats who voted against the House health care bill last November, twenty-six were fiscally conservative Blue Dogs. The preliminary Congressional Budget Office estimate that leaked this morning says that the latest bill would reduce the deficit by $130 billion in the first decade and $1.2 trillion in the second. That's good leverage for Democratic leadership to use on the Blue Dogs.
Congressional Hispanic Caucus members: Rep. Luis Guttierez (D-Ill.) had said that he would not vote for the health care bill, but then changed his mind and said he would support it on Thursday afternoon. He was reticent because the Senate language would not allow illegal immigrants to purchase health insurance in the exchanges, even if they pay completely with their own money. Watch to see what other Congressional Hispanic Caucus members decide.
Retirees: Watch Reps. John Tanner (D-Tenn.), Bart Gordon (D-Tenn.) and Brian Baird (D-Wash.). They all voted against the House health care bill in November, but have announced since that they will retire at the end of this year. Without the pressure of reelection, all three could change their votes to yes.
Update: Bart Gordon released a statement Thursday afternoon saying he would vote for the bill.
Republican Rep. Rep. Anh "Joseph" Cao: He was the only Republican to vote for the House health care bill in November. Local paper in Louisiana reports that President Obama asked him to take another look and he agreed to take another look.
Dem Health Care Bill Pegged at $940B Over 10 Years
Obama Deploys Personal Presidential Touch in Health Care Push
Washington Unplugged: Nancy Cordes on the Final Countdown
CBSNews.com Special Report: Health Care
Here is a list of firm no's and folks on the fence:
FIRM NO DEMOCRATS (20):

1. Rep. Jim Marshall (D-Ga.)
2. Rep. Artur Davis (D-Ala.)
3. Rep. Bobby Bright (D-Ala.)
4. Rep. Mike Ross (D-Ark.)
5. Rep. Dan Boren (D-Okla.)
6. Rep. Ben Chandler (D-K.Y.)
7. Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D-S.D.)
8. Rep. Heath Shuler (D-N.C.)
9. Rep. Chet Edwards (D-Tex.)
10. Rep. Gene Taylor (D-Miss.)
11. Rep. Tim Holden (D-Pa.)
12. Rep. Larry Kissell (D-N.C.)
13. Rep. Frank Kratovil (D-Md.)
14. Rep. Mike McMahon (D-N.Y.)
15. Rep. Walt Minnick (D-Idaho)
16. Rep. Mike McIntyre (D-N.C.) - Voted yes on the House Bill in November
17. Rep. Ike Skelton (D-Mo.)
18. Rep. Collin Peterson (D-Minn.)
19. Rep. Stephen Lynch (D-Mass.) - Voted yes on the House Bill in November
20. Rep. Michael Arcuri (D-N.Y.) - Voted yes on the House Bill in November


UNDECIDED DEMOCRATS (49):
note: This list includes representatives who have announced firm support or opposition to the bill since this was first posted. Additional Democrats have also been added to the list since the first posting.


Rep Harry Mitchell (D-Ariz)
Arizona:
Rep. Harry Mitchell, at left, (Voted yes on the House bill): CBS News calls Mitchell's district one of the most competitive in 2010.
Arkansas:

Rep. Marion Berry (Voted yes on the House bill): Voted in the budget committee to move the bill to the Rules Committee. Retiring.

California:
Rep. Jerry McNerney (Voted yes on the House bill): Tells local San Francisco blog that he's undecided. Does not think the bill goes far enough to cover the uninsured.
Rep. Jim Costa (Voted yes on the House bill): Local station says he's undecided.
Rep. Dennis Cardoza (Voted yes on the House bill): An aide confirms he is undecided.

Colorado:
Rep. Betsy Markey (Voted no on the House bill): Her district was won by John McCain in 2008. Has not committed one way or another, but 2010 will be a tough contest for Markey.
Update: CBS News has confirmed that Markey will vote in favor of the bill.

Florida:
Rep. Allen Boyd (Voted no on the House bill): Almost assuredly no again, but has not come out and said it.

Rep. Suzanne Kosmas (Voted no on the House bill): Has met privately with President Obama at the White House.
Georgia:

Rep. Sanford Bishop (Voted yes on the House bill): Wants strict abortion language

Rep. John Barrow (Voted no on the House bill): Likely no again, but tells local paper he is undecided.

Illinois:

Rep. Dan Lipinski (Voted yes on the House bill): Will be no unless they change the Senate abortion language.

Rep. Jerry Costello (Voted yes on the House bill): Waiting to see the changes to the Senate bill.

Rep. Melissa Bean (Voted yes on the House bill): Staff says wants a chance to read the bill and the CBO score first.
Rep. Bobby Rush (Voted yes on the House bill): Staff says he is undecided.


Rep. Brad Ellsworth (D-Ind.)
Indiana: Rep. Joe Donnelly (Voted yes on the House bill): Will vote no without stricter language on abortion.

Rep. Brad Ellsworth, at left, (Voted yes on the House bill): Wants strict abortion language and is running for Senate.

Rep. Baron Hill (Voted yes on the House bill): Wants strict abortion language.

Louisiana:

Rep. Charles Melancon (Voted no on the House bill): Running for Senate. Likely still a no.
Massachusetts:
Rep. Michael Capuano (Voted yes on the House bill): Tells Boston Herald that he's "not there yet."
Rep. Stephen Lynch (Voted yes on the House bill): Wants to see final language.
Update: Stephen Lynch has told CBS News that he is now a no vote for the bill.


Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.)
Michigan: Rep. Bart Stupak, at left, (Voted yes on the House bill): He's a no unless abortion language is more strict.

Rep. Mark Schauer (Voted yes on the House bill): Tells the Detroit News that he's waiting to see final language.
Update: Schauer now says he will support the bill
Rep. Gary Peters (Voted yes on the House bill): Tells the Detroit News he wants to see the cost.

Mississippi:

Rep. Travis Childers (Voted no on the House bill): Very likely a no again.

Nevada:
Rep. Dina Titus (Voted yes on the House bill): Tells local radio station that she is undecided.
New Jersey:
Rep. John Adler (Voted no on the House bill): Tells local paper that he will vote no if the final bill does not do more to control cost.

New Mexico:
Rep. Harry Teague (Voted no on the House bill): Waiting for language.
New York:
Rep. Tim Bishop (Voted yes on the House bill): Voted in the budget committee to move the bill to the rules committee

Rep. Michael Arcuri (Voted yes on the House bill): Wants to see the final language.
Update: Arcuri put out a statement Thursday night saying he would vote no.

Rep. Bill Owens (Voted yes on the House bill): Tells local paper that he is undecided
North Carolina:
Rep. Bob Etheridge (Voted yes on the House bill): Local Web site says he's still undecided.
North Dakota:
Rep. Earl Pomeroy (Voted yes on the House bill): Concerned about Senate abortion language and costs. Democrats just gave him the plum job of the social security subcommittee on Ways and Means after Rangel was forced to step down and the committee reorganized. Possibly a sweetener.
Ohio:
Rep. John Boccieri (Voted no on the House bill): He skipped Mr. Obama's event in Ohio even though he was invited by the White House. Check out this article on a plane flying overhead in Canton with a banner that read "Tell Rep. Boccieri no abortion funding."
Update: Boccieri announced on Friday morning that he would support the bill.

Rep. Betty Sutton (Voted yes on the House bill): Wants to see the bill. Mr. Obama's event Monday was in her district.

Rep. Marcy Kaptur (Voted yes on the House bill): Concerns with abortion funding and explaining the bill to constituents so they understand what's in it.

Rep. Steve Driehaus (Voted yes on the House bill): Now considered a likely no. Wants stricter abortion language.

Rep. Zack Space (Voted yes on the House bill): Does not like senate bill and wants to see language.

Oregon:
Rep. Kurt Schrader (Voted yes on the House bill): On CBS News list of most competitive races.

Rep. Jason Altmire (D-Pa.)
Pennsylvania:
Rep. Jason Altmire, at left, (Voted no on the House bill): He has always liked the Senate bill more than the House bill because he says it does more to control costs. Tells CBS that he's "had conversations with president, and some cabinet secretaries and others at the White House." Tells local paper that he's talked to Mr. Obama 3 times. Altmire also tells CBS that he is against using a self-executing rule to deem the Senate bill passed without a straight up or down vote on it. (More on Altmire from CBS Station KDKA in Pittsburgh)

Rep. Nancy Dahlkemper (Voted yes on the House bill): Depends on abortion language and wants to read the final bill

Rep. Chris Carney (Voted yes on the House bill): Has concerns about Senate abortion language.

Tennessee:
Rep. Bart Gordon, at left, (Voted no on the House bill): Possibly a yes now that he is retiring. Spokesman tells the Tennessean that he wants to see final language. Gordon talked to reporters in the Speaker's lobby the other night and defended using the self-executing rule to deem the Senate bill passed saying that it's just as legitimate a rule as the filibuster so it can be used. Gordon's top concern is controlling costs.
Update: Bart Gordon released a statement Thursday afternoon saying he would support the bill.
Rep. Lincoln Davis (Voted no on the House bill): Very likely no again. Has not told local papers which way he will vote.

Rep. John Tanner (Voted no on the House bill): He's retiring though so leadership is pushing on him.

Texas:

Rep. Henry Cuellar (Voted Yes on the House bill): Wants stricter abortion language.

Rep. Solomon Ortiz (Voted yes on the House bill): Dallas Morning News reports that he is undecided.

Rep. Ciro Rodrigues (Voted yes on the House bill): Dallas Morning News reports that he is undecided.

Utah:
Rep. Jim Matheson (Voted no in Novembet): President Obama offered his brother a U.S. Circuit Judge post two weeks ago. Sweetener?

Virginia:
Rep. Rick Boucher (Voted no on the House bill): Some Republicans expect him to be a no again. He has not committed either way.

Rep. Glenn Nye (Voted no on the House bill): CBS News lists the district as one of the most competitive in 2010.

Rep. Tom Perriello (Voted yes on the House bill): CBS News lists this freshman's district as one of the most competitive in 2010. He has defended the Senate abortion language to Hill media outlets.
Rep. Gerry Connolly (Voted yes on the House bill): Aide tells CBS News he is still undecided.

Washington:
Rep. Brian Baird (Voted no on the House bill): Maybe a yes now that he's retiring tells McClatchy Newspapers that he needs to see the actual language before he makes up his mind.
West Virginia:
Rep. Alan Mollohan (Voted yes on the House bill): CBS news calls this seat one of the most competitive for 2010.

Wisconsin:
Rep. Ron Kind (Voted yes on the House bill): He voted no in the budget committee this past Monday to move the reconciliation package to the rules committee. Has met with Mr. Obama. Wants more Medicare reimbursement reform for hospitals according to a local blog.

More Coverage of the Health Care Reform Debate:

Dem Health Care Bill Pegged at $940B Over 10 Years
Washington Unplugged: Nancy Cordes on the Final Countdown
Dueling News Conferences
Obama Cancels Foreign Trip for Health Care Push
GOP Plots Ways to Fight Health Care
Temperature Rising for Health Care Votes
Health Care Passage Plan Unconstitutional?
Obama Pushes Health Care Bill in Combative Fox Interview
Pelosi: Health Care Bill "Best Initiative" for the Economy
Republicans Have Used "Slaughter Solution" Many Times
Stupak's Life a "Living Hell" because of Abortion Position
Obama's Health Care Plan: What Do You Think?
CBSNews.com Special Report: Health Care


(CBS)
Jill Jackson is a CBS News Capitol Hill Producer. You can read more of her posts in Hotsheet here. You can also follow her on Twitter.
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UPDATE FROM LAS VEGAS REVIEW JOURNAL 9:55 AM FRIDAY MARCH 19


Representative Titus to vote for the bill. (see link above).

Update: Polls now show strongly opposed and strongly for are equal, with the scale now tipped to public support (strong, yes and tendency toward) now at 57%. This is a major change from polls as recent as last weekend. 3-19-10  noon Pacific.



32,000



32,000,000 -- that's the number of Americans who will get health insurance under the President's plan.1

That's also a little more than the entire populations of Ohio, Virginia, Kentucky and Arizona -- COMBINED.2

For the past couple weeks, we've been using key numbers to help raise awareness about how we just can't wait any longer for health insurance reform.  We used $1,115 to tell the story of how skyrocketing premiums are crippling America's workers.  We used 8 to convey how widespread and severe discrimination for pre-existing conditions is across the health insurance industry.   And we used numbers like 625 and 50/50 to clearly show that any one of us is at risk of losing insurance in our broken health care system.

Today -- in our last number of the series -- we're using 32,000,000 to represent not only all those who will get health care, but also all the numerous benefits America's families and small businesses will see from health insurance reform.  From eliminating discrimination based on pre-existing conditions to controlling costs and lowering the national deficit to providing tax credits for middle class families and small businesses, health insurance reform will finally put America's families and small businesses in control over their own health care.

Watch our new 'Health Reform by the Numbers' wrap-up video and learn more about what you have to gain from reform:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/health-care-meeting/by-the-numbers/32000000?utm_source=email44&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=healthreform

32,000,000 is the last number in ‘Health Reform by the Numbers,' our online campaign to raise awareness about why the time is now for health insurance reform.  Help spread the word by sharing this message with your family, friends and online networks.
Let's get it done!

Sincerely,

Nancy-Ann DeParle
Director, White House Office of Health Reform