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Friday, April 6, 2012

Can you plagiarize yourself?











Image: Wikimedia commons,
Guillaume Carels
An interesting concept shows up in the Scientist: the concept of being accused of plagiarizing your own work. The story begins below and is continued at the link provided"


When Robert Barbato of the E. Philip Saunders College of Business at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) heard he was being accused of plagiarizing his own work, he was a bit surprised. "I can't plagiarize myself -- those are my own words," he said.

And he is not alone in his views. Some scientists and publishers argue that it's "unavoidable" for scientists to re-use portions of their own text (not images or data, of course) from previous papers, and doing so may even be good practice. But others disagree, including many journals -- who have retracted papers in response.


"There are many ways you can say the same thing even when it comes to very technical language," saidMiguel Roigof St. John's University, who has written extensively about plagiarism in academic literature. "It's a matter of what some have labeled poor scholarly etiquette."

Read more:When is self-plagiarism ok? - The Scientist - Magazine of the Life Scienceshttp://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/57676/#ixzz0zcDDIrlE


Posted 9/11/11

16 comments:

Madison BC 550 said...

I believe that plagiarism is plagiarism. however it is sometimes hard to change your writing style. everyone has a writing style that they stick to, some people do it without even knowing they are doing it. and that is something hard to break. so to an extent we all plagiarize ourselves at some point or another. our opinions are our opinions and sometimes they over lap between papers and projects or outlines. it is kind of inevitable.

Anonymous said...

Van Nguyen, com 101, sec. 116
When I took English 101 and first learned the concept of plagiarism, I was so surprise to know that using my own ideas from one class to submit for another class is considered plagiarism also. I agree that we cannot steal other people works and make it sound like our own, but if I reuse my own, I don't know what is the problem with that? Especially for experts, who spend long time researching on some projects, why they can not repeat themselves?

Amy Ridings Com 101 116 said...

This is the first I have ever heard of reusing your own ideas is considered plagiarism. If you can't use your own ideas and thoughts, then what can you use without quoting? It doesn't make any sense. The laws of plagiarism are becoming more and more strict. I understand the thought process on trying to make sure that one doesn't steal someone else words, we need to give credit where credit is due. However, why should you have to give yourself credit for something you already said? Isn't writing the paper already giving yourself credit?

Courtney Burk said...

I do not think there should even be a thing called self-plagiarism. I believe if you wrote something in your own words that you should be able to reuse it as many times as you want to within your own projects.

Jennifer said...

I don't feel as though you would have to site yourself as a resource if you are just stating an opinion that you had previously had, you don't need to reference that. I am pretty sure that I had written a paper about how much I like ice cream when I was in 2nd grade, so if I should ever want to make that statement again on record I have to site that I've said it before? I think that is just taking plagarism to an obnoxious degree. However if you had discovered something original a fact or theory never proven by another person and you were restating that then you could reference the first time you had made that statement as it could be important to the point you are currently making. It's about making educated decisions with a little common sense.

Jenny BC 550

Kayla Geale said...

Self-plagiarism is a meaningless concept. If I already said it, it's my choice whether or not I say it again. No one can tell me otherwise. I'd like to see them go to a Chevy vehicle manufacturer and say "um.. excuse me, but you already made a camero. it's in violation of copyright laws." Yeah, okay, like that's really how the 'real' world works. Once your idea, always your idea

Maura G said...

Nonsense. If I am brilliant enough to come up with something; an idea, a writing, a concept & can recycle that & reapply it, then so be it!! Of course it would not be acceptable to reuse entire projects and papers for multiple classes, etc. Maura G Com 101-6002

Chad Charles said...

That is ridiculous, to be accused of plagarizing yourself. Next thing is to sue yourself from breaking your own copyright. Words are words, especially if they are our own. Sometimes I wonder what happens to common sense and how far is too far. Com 101 6002

Anonymous said...

A paper that is an opinion piece (such as an essay) does not usually have formal citation, but can make references "I think this, such and such thinks this" if is helps to support your opinion. A formal thesis or paper (which may have a perspective or framework but is not opinion) in which the author re-uses their own work can solve the problem of "self plagarism" by citing their own prior work. The purpose of citations is not simply to avoid a charge of plagarism but also to give readers information on where to research further. So the lesson is when in doubt cite cite cite, even if you are using your own prior knowledge! References, citation and support add to your credibility. by Laura Lynch

Dulcenea Leae said...

I find no wrong in plagiarizing yourself. When someone puts something within their own words, that is their very own thoughts and hard work put into it. It seriously makes no sense to me.

Dulcenea Leae
HN 4041

Anonymous said...

A published work may belong to the publisher, so even if you wrote it if you do not cite yourself you are guilty as far as intelectual rights law is concerned.

Jessica Tatina said...

I think it's totally ok to use information that you've talked about before, as long as you keep in fresh by stating in a different way, or maybe a new light.

Aleksandra D. COM101-6003 said...

I always thought that to plagiarize is to use others work without giving them the credit for it. I would have to agree with Mr. Barbato that if I use my own word or work that is not plagiarism because that is or was my work to begin with.

Trevino01 said...

Plagiarism is a very serious matter. It is great to do research on the topic that you are writing about, but you must be sure to not copy what you have learned. You have to be able to put information into your own words. Some people are better than others at doing so, but if u practice, it will start to become simple and easy.

Justin Parke BC6003 said...

Self-plagiarism is a joke! I had a teacher for a history class that would enter every paper we wrote into whichever database the school used at the time. That way student’s couldn’t sell their old papers to future students. Anyway I heard of a couple students that had being harassed for using too many similarities from past papers they had written in their present work. It’s just a little out of line not being able to advance on your own words.

Justin Parke BC6003

Leslie Gomez- 4041 said...

I disagree, you cannot plagiarize yourself if it is your own words, your own thoughts. That would mean before every sentence we say or story we tell in person we'd have to say, "April 12, 2009. Henderson, NV. I said so and so." That is ridiculous. When photographers photograph, they edit the photos sometimes taking peices of previous pictures. This would be considered plagiarizing their own work? Kind of ridiculous if you ask me. Our thoughts are ours, they belong to us so we should be able to use them whenever we want. Re-stating a statement that we ourselves once said is not plagiarism. I could see why scientists would find this merely impossible.